best/easiest way to scrap old paint off roof eaves

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Old 04-29-06, 07:47 PM
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best/easiest way to scrap old paint off roof eaves

Hi,

I have two triangular areas to paint. While washing it with a garden hose some loose paint came off. I let it dried and started to scrape the paint off with a hard putty knife or paint scraper. Not all the paint wanted to come off.

So my question is what's best/easiest way to scrape off the old paint. I don't have a power washer but I thought that would be easiest. How about a drill and a wire wheel attachment or an orbital sander with coarse sand paper?

I also read in the recent Newsletter that bare wood should first be treated with a water-repellent before priming. Can I skip this step and just prime and then a top coat?

Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 04-30-06, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by hoangnguyen3
I also read in the recent Newsletter that bare wood should first be treated with a water-repellent before priming. Can I skip this step and just prime and then a top coat?

I wouldn't recomend this as not all water repellents and paint are compatible. You wouldn't want to compromise the bond between paint and substrate.

Dilegent scraping with a pull scraper and putty knife is all that is needed for the repaint to last. You can use an electric sander to either remove or feather out the transision from raw wood to old paint. You could also use paint remover or a heat gun to soften the paint so you could then scrape it off. If you use a heat gun make sure you only use enough to soften the paint and not overly heat the wood.
 
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Old 04-30-06, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by hoangnguyen3
I also read in the recent Newsletter that bare wood should first be treated with a water-repellent before priming. Can I skip this step and just prime and then a top coat?
Yes, I agree with marksr
Skip the water-repellent
I'm not sure where they got that from
I have seen some wacky DIY tips in newsletters and magazines though

Depending on how much bare wood is showing after scraping, you can spot prime or prime the whole thing
 
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Old 04-30-06, 10:26 AM
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Thank you to both for your information. I will skip the water repellent. I didn't even know there was a pull paint scraper until I saw one last night at the HD. I still have about two-thirds way to go with scraping. Hopefully the pull scraper works better. I will then prime all the bare wood.

I did noticed some large cracks yesterday. I bought Ready Patch (I think that's the name). Is that better than just caulking with a latex caulk? Should I prime before patching or patch, let dry, and then prime the whole are (bare wood and patched spots)?

Thanks again. I am about to go up to the roof and scrape. At lunch I will check back to see if you post about the patching.
 
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Old 04-30-06, 11:55 AM
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Cracks and holes should be filled with a filler
(I don't know what Ready Patch is, if it says it's a paint-able wood filler you should be OK)
Spaces showing in between pieces should be caulked

The proper way is usually prime patch prime
Sometimes the first or second prime can be skipped depending on the exact situation (patch area has adhering paint, patch are very small, type of patch used, etc...)
W/o a specific reason not to, then prime patch prime is usually the best course of action
 
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Old 04-30-06, 06:00 PM
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I would add that caulking is usually preferred as it remains slightly flexable, use an acrylic siliconized caulk for best results.
You should only use the patching material on single solid pieces of wood - mainly to fill holes or dress up damaged wood. If the wood is cracked in two - use caulk.
 
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Old 04-30-06, 06:18 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
...If the wood is cracked in two - use caulk.
Good point
 
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Old 05-03-06, 02:33 PM
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My two cents:

1) Oil based primer may be best for bare wood.

2) If you use flat paint, it will help to hide flaws. More gloss = more noticeable flaws.
 
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