Worst Case -- Staining Bathroom Cabinets


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Old 05-21-06, 05:35 PM
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Worst Case -- Staining Bathroom Cabinets

I have 20 yr old oak (veneer) vanity cabinet which is basically very sound, but some surface wear. What's the worst case scenario if I were to simply apply stain over it "as is" ? I don't have time to sand or strip. From my many years working w/stains, I don't think there's really any major downside. The stain shouldn't flake or chip, etc. This is just a quick spruce-up for resale.

Thanks!
 
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Old 05-21-06, 06:25 PM
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Stain is really only for raw or pourous wood. Since the vanity undoubtbly had a finish on it I doubt that it would accept stain as is. It may be a canidate for either a fresh coat of varnish/poly or more likely a tinted poly which may help to hide the wear. it should at least have a light sanding first.
 
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Old 05-21-06, 10:14 PM
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Originally Posted by pieper
...20 yr old oak (veneer) cabinet...some surface wear. What's the worst case scenario if I were to simply apply stain over it "as is" ?
Worst case?
1)The stain would sink in where the finish has worn enough to allow it to do so , but not anywhere else
= very blotchy finish
2) The stain would not sink in anywhere
=sticky waste of time
Best case?
See #2

I also feel it's highly unlikely the vanity would have made it this long w/o some sort of finish over the stain
The finish would prevent a new quick coat of stain from really doing anything
 
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Old 05-22-06, 03:43 AM
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Thanks for the feedback, folks. Went ahead and re-stained, and it looks fabulous. For whatever reason. Filled the worn spots, blended well, and (dare I say?!?), looks almost like new. Will seal with Butcher's Wax -- or maybe Tung Oil -- and hope for the best.

Sometimes it's worth the risk. Guess the real "worst case scenario" would have been to replace it, but I seem to have avoided that expense. Not like it's a tremendous expense, but still...
 
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Old 05-22-06, 05:31 AM
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Wow, I'm surprised
That's great though
Glad it worked out for you
 
 

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