Chalking interior paint - help!

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  #1  
Old 05-27-06, 02:17 PM
M
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Chalking interior paint - help!

I've been in the middle of a major remodeling/redecorating project for the past year or more, and my latest segment of it involved redecorating the living room, dining room and sunporch. I thought I was finished last week when we got the sunporch painted and the trim work put back up. In touching up the dining room, however, with its absolutely STUNNING Wild Raisin (Behr) color, I noticed that wherever I touched those walls, with whatever I touched them with, including just brushing against it with my arm, I would leave a scuff mark of what looked like gray dust of some sort.

Decided it must be sheetrock dust (we'd just had the sunporch resheetrocked) and that I'd have to either vacuum or wash the walls.

What a disaster.

Wherever I washed left streaks, and while I might get a bit of the gray "dust" off the wall, it would then settle into the indentations of my plaster walls. I could see everyplace that I washed versus where I hadn't washed. Vacuuming met with the same level of success, which was no success. Wherever the nozzle touched the wall, it left this scuff mark. It was obviously NOT sheetrock dust.

I wrote Behr, and the reply I received suggested that I put a very thin coat of water-based polyurethane over all of the walls. Huh? I had just put on two coats of paint, they were lovely walls (unless I touched them), and I chose flat paint for a reason: I don't want ANY shine.

I wrote this guy back and ask what do I do about the places where I already attempted to clean the walls that now had all this gray residue? He suggested that I touchup any of those spots before putting on the polyurethane.

He then went on to do more or less a sales pitch, how Behr offers such wonderful deep colors that many other manufacturers don't offer, and that it was the extra pigment in the paint that was causing this dusting or burnishing. I haven't written him back but I feel like I should do so and ask him why his paint doesn't come with a warning label that if you choose a deep color, you can never, ever touch or wash any walls that you cover in this paint again unless you first coat them with polyurethane. Incredible.

So, long story, but what do you all recommend? Should I try to find another paint, go back to my usual paint supplier (Sherwin Williams) and get some of their better quality paint and attempt a third coat, or will all dark paints have this problem? Should I follow the advice of this Behr tech/email person? I just LOVE this paint color, but what an incredible headache.

Mitz
 

Last edited by MitzMN; 05-27-06 at 04:18 PM.
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  #2  
Old 05-27-06, 04:47 PM
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Welcome to the forums

Deep colors can be problematic but I have never heard of the paint basically washing off the wall. Was sheetrock primed first?

SWP should be able to match your behr [or anyother] color. They also have decent deep color bases. The main thing is to make sure that you have a good substrate to apply the paint. This may require a primer.

Bring a sample of your paint/color to SWP and explain the situation to them so they can help determine if you can just paint another coat or if something else will need to be done first.
 
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Old 05-27-06, 05:09 PM
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I wasn't making myself clear, I guess.

Despite writing a novel, I was unclear.

The paint is NOT coming off. It's adhering very well. The paint has some type of residue on it that is not visible until you touch the wall. Then you cannot clean that now visible residue as it makes the whole wall look streaked with what looks like chalk or gray dust, which the Behr guy said was because of all the pigment in the paint.

Would a coat of paint from another manufacturer cure the problem, do you think? That's really my question. And if you think that would cure it, which manufacturer's paint would you recommend?

Thanks.
 
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Old 05-27-06, 05:20 PM
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Originally Posted by MitzMN
looks like chalk or gray dust, which the Behr guy said was because of all the pigment in the paint.



Sorry I misunderstood, happens sometimes
What the behr guy told you is true. Because of all the pigment deep colors can be problems. Cheaper paints almost always have more problems than the better grades. SWP has changed some of the names of their paints so I'm not sure if their deep base line is still called deep accents or changed to something else.

It is hard to get completely away from burnishing problems with deep colors [and they rarely touch up well] but use of quality paint should eliminate the majority of problems.
 
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Old 05-29-06, 05:01 PM
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Deep colors are problematic when it comes to things like that
But, the advice to poly the walls was way out of line
I'm shocked that's the solution they came up with, although as I am familiar with the company, I really shouldn't be surprised with anything they say anymore

A quality paint will solve the problem
Yes, deep colors are more prone to burnishing, but it is usually not such an issue, at least not with a better paint
Not when normal care is taken with the project

A quality Ben Moore paint would work fine, but in this case I would recommend Sherwin Williams Deep Colors (which may still be Deep Accents in your area)
The results should be spectacular*

* I strongly recommend a quality 2.5" angled Purdy brush and 1/2 nap 50/50 poly/wool roller sleeve(s) also from SWP to ensure extreme ease of application and major spectacular-ness
 
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Old 05-30-06, 05:21 AM
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Thanks, Marksr and Slickshift

If only I'd listened to myself! The entire rest of my house I did in Sherwin Williams paint because I like their quality and my professional painter (who only primed the walls in the new kitchen and bath) recommended it. I'm a firm believer in good products and good tools to make what is a relatively cheap project (the cost of the paint) but a very time-consuming and putzy project have the desired outcome.

My cousin who was doing most of the painting with me is a big Behr fan, so I listened to her and went in this one room only with Behr -- probably the only room where it wouldn't have worked well as it is the deepest color in my house. The livingroom is avacado in the Color Accents paint from SW, the ceilings are all SW 400, the sunporch is SW ceiling and their regular 200 flat latex in Baguette. I did Cashmere in the kitchen and their special paint in the bathroom. I like dealing with them, they know their stuff, and why I listened to my cousin and did this one room in the Behr, I'll never know. She was unhappy with how thin the SW paint was, and she complained, too, about Benjamin Moore paint being so thin. I have to agree that the Behr was much thicker, but thicker is evidently not necessarily better. Behr always does well in Consumer Reports, too, which I checked and decided I couldn't really go wrong -- right? WRONG!

I'll be heading up to SW today and getting the correct paint.

I should have known when they gave me enamel paint the first time instead of just a flat latex that this was going down the wrong path.

Thanks again for your ideas and suggestion and for helping me resolve this problem, Marksr and Slickshift. I always buy good quality brushes and roller covers. Why try to do something that I'm far from an expert at with one hand tied behind my back? Good tools are a must.

Next time, I'll listen to the expert and MYSELF!

Mitz
 
  #7  
Old 05-30-06, 07:41 AM
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Paint just being thicker doesn't necessarily make it better. How it brushes and covers is an important factor.

The lessons hardest learned always the ones most remembered. Congradulations on passing the first test in painting 101
 
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Old 05-30-06, 01:38 PM
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If SW and BM are so thin, but work so well, don't you wonder why Behr is made so much thicker?
 
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