avoiding mold

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Old 06-01-06, 02:43 PM
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avoiding mold

i may be the only one who doesnt know this... can someone please inform, what kind of paint helps avoid mold build-up? my bathroom is out of control... thanks in advance!
 
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Old 06-01-06, 03:32 PM
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Absolutely the best mold/mildew resistant paint out there is Zinsser's Perma-White

I was living in an 1800s house with a tiny bathroom
No fan (it was a rental-I couldn't install one either)
And two long hot shower type people (I'm a luke-warm type myself) one a teenage girl
...and the clothes washer was in there too
...and it was right next to the living room, so you had to close the door when running the washer
Your getting the idea now

I had to X-14 (mildecide) once a month
If I let it go 6 weeks it took over

After painting with the Perma-White, I never had to mildecide that bathroom again

The only drawback is it's only tintable to pastels and light colors
If you want a darker bathroom, it's possible to mix up some good stuff
But the Z's P-W is the best
 
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Old 06-01-06, 03:49 PM
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thanks!!

thanks, that is a life-saver! its amazing how quickly this stuff is growing in there (and i actually have a fan). seems innocuous, but i hear its dangerous to inhale, so i need to get on that. great advice!
 
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Old 06-01-06, 04:39 PM
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No problem
The mold you are seeing is most assuredly common bathroom mold, not the toxic black mold you may have heard of

But still, it not a good idea to be breathing in the spores, especially if you are allergic

You may want to check that you fan is actually taking air out of the bath and venting properly (outside)

A candle can help determine if the fan is working, checking the venting usually means a trip into the attic, which you may want to do to anyway to make sure there's no roof leaks, and the mold isn't coming from another source

As for the Perma-White, you'll want to kill any mold (X-14 or bleach) then do a light sanding before painting

The Perma-White does not need primer
If there's any dark mold stains, those should be sealed (with Zinsser's BIN) if needed
But other than that, the P-W is self-priming
 
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Old 06-01-06, 08:29 PM
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If the mold in your bathroom is "out of control", as you say, it's likely that the roots of the mold are eating the paper behind the paint. Many people think you can just wash the wall with bleach and paint over it with any old paint, but that's not the case. Painting over mold won't do any good- if the mold is bad enough, that is, you may have to remediate.

But one other point pertaining to the question, semi-gloss and high gloss paints are good for bathrooms because mold has a hard time growing on slick surfaces, and those types of paint are very washable. Especially will it be helpful if the walls are washed frequently with Borax detergent, which contains natural surfactants which repel mold.

I'd suggest that paint may not be a permanent solution to your mold problem... whereas washing the walls regularly and getting rid of the bathroom humidity by running fans would help. (I'm suggesting more than just a little ceiling vent fan) If the humidity in the bathroom can be kept below 60% most of the time, mold will not survive. So lowering the humidity after showers, for example, is a huge factor.

It's likely that your current problem is exacerbated by mold that is in inaccessible areas- behind the baseboard or vanity, for example- or behind your current layer of paint. That's why remediating it might be helpful, else it will keep recurring with increasing frequency.
 
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Old 06-02-06, 04:09 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper
But one other point pertaining to the question, semi-gloss and high gloss paints are good for bathrooms because mold has a hard time growing on slick surfaces, and those types of paint are very washable. .
IMO the biggest reason you are less likely to have mold on enamel is because the paint will repell water where as flat paint will obsorb some of the moisture. Mold/mildew requires two key ingrediants to grow - moisture and heat.

You can add extra mildewcide to most paints if needed.
 
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Old 06-02-06, 06:07 AM
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That could be a factor as well, I'm not sure. From what I was taught during the classes I took on the subject, they said that it was due to the porousity of the surface. Mold cannot easily grow on slick or smooth surfaces. (glass or a laminate countertop, for example) Mold spores are more likely to cling and grow to "rough" surfaces, microscopically speaking.

The other ingredient mold needs is food. (and obviously oxygen). Mold can eat on most types of soap scum, and it loves wallpaper, drywall paper and gypsum. Mold doesn't necessarily need heat to grow, although heat plays a role in that warmer air can hold more moisture.
 
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Old 06-02-06, 07:38 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper
they said that it was due to the porousity of the surface.
That is true, solvent based paints have a denser base which is why it seals better. All enamels have a slicker [and less pourous] than flat paints. That is one of the reasons enamel is always recomended for bathrooms.
 
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Old 06-02-06, 10:06 AM
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It's getting a bit thick with info here
Most of it's good, but I feel a need to clear things up
A casual reader looking for mold info may get confused

Originally Posted by tickledorange
what kind of paint helps avoid mold build-up?
Zinsser's Perma-White is the best at avoiding mold build up, followed closely by Moore's K&B (Ben Moore)
I'm sure the Sherwin Williams equivalent product is similar to the M's K&B, but I have not tried it

A mold resistant paint can be "made" in the paint shop by adding an additive to a quality paint
These also work well

Last on the list are regular paints of any sheen
They are not really m/m resistant
As a general rule, the glossier paints resist mold/mildew better than flats
By no means is a regular semi-gloss better at m/m resistance than (for example) Z's P-W in an eggshell finish
It's just that among regular paint, yes, the shinier the sheen, the better the m/m resistance


Onto the mold:
Mold needs food, air, moisture, and heat

Painting directly over mold is not a good idea
Even with some mildecides in the paint, there's no guarantee it will be killed...it must be killed or it will spread as long as it has access to those four things

Killing the mold, removing the dead stuff, sealing any stains left behind with shellac (to seal access to those four things), and then painting is the accepted and proper procedure, and it works well

I'd recommend one of the more m/m resistant paints or mixtures above


As for tickledorange's problem
It is not possible to say for sure what it is from over the interweb

I believe the best course of action is the steps I outlined
If after X-14ing the bathroom, there are still mold stains, that could possibly (could) be live mold in the paper
Sealing these in with BIN (or a similar shellac-based primer/sealer) should take care of that
The mildecides in the PW or K&B should handle any strays
An inspection of the exhaust venting system, and other possible mold sources (attic) would be in order

If the mold comes back after that procedure, it's time to call a pro
 
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Old 06-02-06, 05:18 PM
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Everything you ever wanted to know, and some you don't want to know, about mold is right here.
 
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Old 06-03-06, 01:38 PM
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fwiw - Zinsser has made several improvements to P-W and even has several versions. You also have a much wider range of tinting options than a few years ago where "pastel" was about it.

the best just keeps getting better.

-art-
 
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Old 08-25-07, 07:51 AM
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Cool ongoing mold problems

I have just learned the hard (expensive) way that my continueing mold problems around my ceiling vents were due to no gaskets in the air vent. Replacing the air vents a couple of years ago after first noticing the mold was one of many steps taken to correct a problem that kept returning along with the following steps- checking/cleaning the duct work, repeated full inspections of the HVAC, re-insullating the attic, bleaching the interior of the ducts along with the ceiling area and a few other steps.
Finally a repairman asked about the gaskets and after creating some I ahve had no more problems,,,,,yet.
 
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Old 08-25-07, 03:33 PM
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In addition to putting in a bathroom paint, you really need to figure out why your bathroom gets so moldy to begin with. Normal bathrooms simply do not develop crazy amounts of fungal growth in a few weeks. You likely have either blocked ventilation, or simply not nearly enough for your size bathroom.

SirWired
 
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