What if I can't paint primer within 7 days?

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Old 06-10-06, 07:16 AM
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What if I can't paint primer within 7 days?

I only learned recently that primer only holds it's "stickiness" for seven days. I don't have large blocks of time available to always get this timing right. I usually prime an area one day when I have time and then paint it in a couple of weeks! Part of it is that I hate cleaning up so much that to have to use two sets of brushes and then clean two sets of brushes wouldn't work for me. (I know -- use disposable rollers -- I'm going to do that next).

Also, recently, I bought spray paint to do some molding. THe directions say...."Apply several coats every few minutes........[later in the directions].....may be recoated within 1 hour or in 24 hours...."

Aaargh! So if I forget and don't get back to it within the hour, I have to wait until the next day?! I already didn't follow the directions (becasue I didn't read them right away -- ooops), so is the paint going to all peel off?

I am interested in anyone's experience and/or advice.

P.S. Kudo's to the moderator who wrote that painting is a craft -- he's right -- and believe me, if I could afford to pay someone else, I would. In the meantime I'll keep trying to discipline myself into learning how to paint according to the rules.

Thanks all!

Loren
 
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Old 06-10-06, 07:35 AM
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Originally Posted by loren700
I only learned recently that primer only holds it's "stickiness" for seven days.
I have been a pro painter for 35+ yrs and never heard of this. The only real problem with not covering the primer for a long time is it is prone to get dirty - primer doesn't wash or wear well. Exterior primer will break down if exposed to the weather for too long.

Some spray can paint has to have multiple coats applied before curing [or after] to prevent wrinkling or lifting of the paint. Sanding is usually required after 24hrs.

Brushes and rollers can be wrapped tightly with plastic and when unwrapped are in the same condition they were in prior to wrapping. I wouldn't reccomend this for more than a few days although you could go longer if stored in a refridgerator [don't freeze latex]
 
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Old 06-19-06, 05:24 PM
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a paint distributor told me that this applies to some oil-based primers, but not latex. I do know this was an issue with car paint back when I messed with that stuff.
 
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Old 06-21-06, 08:36 AM
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Thanks

Thanks to Sandbagger and MarksR. I'm glad I don't have to wrry so much about the primer, 'tho now I still have no explanantion for why some of the paint peeled. Actiually it didn't peel exactly. On my kitchen cabinets, there are just a couple of nicks I guess in the paint, but down to the wood. (This is all latex, I'm talking about here.) If it was not the age of the primer coat, there is another explanation for the paint chips that came off.

A question for marksr: In your experience, if you have to sand the spray coat, will it say so on the can?

Thanks again!,
Loren700
 
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Old 06-21-06, 08:46 AM
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Most fresh enamel paint should be sanded lightly before applying the next coat. The can should have directions for applying the paint but.......

Latex paint/primers don't dry as hard as their oil base counterpart. It is possible there was some contamination on the wood which didn't allow the primer to bond properly. It is also possible that top coat recieved more abuse than it could take [in that spot] and bonded so well to the primer that it had no choice but to pull paint and primer off. Really hard to say without being there to look at it.
 
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Old 06-21-06, 11:39 AM
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Thanks Again!

Dear Marksr:
You've been really helpful....Thanks!
Loren700
 
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Old 06-21-06, 12:08 PM
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Loren - painting kitchen cabinets is a dicey proposition at best. Surface prep is critical with all the contaminents they pick up over time, and regular wall paint just won't take the abuse. Your best bet is a paint specifically formulated for cabinets, and follow direction to the letter. warning - this stuff can be a little pricey.
 
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Old 06-23-06, 06:26 AM
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Thanks Again

It's good to have a professional opinion. It makes sense that items in the kitchen would need special preparation becasue of all the grease and food stuff flying around. In fact, I had to scrape down all of the cabinet doors as there was a thin clear coat of something on them. It was a real pain. I can see why people get paid to do this!
Rgds,
Loren
 
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