Help! Need ideas for fixing previous paint issues.


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Old 06-27-06, 02:34 PM
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Unhappy Help! Need ideas for fixing previous paint issues.

My husband and I bought a wartime home and the previous owners had splatter painted part of the walls and then on the bottom used a horizontal line pattern with paint as well. It is horrible for the space and they have so many layers and such thick paint that if we paint over it, the walls will retain the texture. I'm wanting to fix it as inexpensively and easily as we can, as there are a number of things that we need to put our money towards to fix in the house. Is wallpaper an option? Would it hide the imperfections in the wall? I'm not a huge fan of wallpaper, but short of re drywalling the hallway and dining room, we can't seem to find a solution on how to mask the terrible textures. Please Help!
 
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Old 06-27-06, 02:46 PM
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Some of the heavier wallpapers should hide the texture but many won't. What I would do would be to give the walls a quick rough sanding and then skim coat with joint compound. When the j/c is dry, sand lightly, prime and paint. That should give you good looking walls with minimal work.
 
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Old 06-27-06, 03:03 PM
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Re: Joint Compound

I've never used joint compound before, but I assume I would apply it using a putty knife or trowel (sp?) type thing correct? In the hallway, there actually is only the horizontal lines on the bottom of the wall and flat top. If I use the joint compound there, how do I blend the flat area to the area with the texture? In the dining room I would have to apply the compound on the entire wall. I'm going to need a lot of compound!
 
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Old 06-27-06, 03:20 PM
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It is best to thin the j/c slightly when skim coating - makes it flow/work easier. A 6" broad knife will work if you are not comfortable with a 10" or 12" knife. While ideally you would skim a large area at one time you can also skim little squares in a checkerboard pattern, when dry skim the squares you left.

If the wall is slick and you only need to skim the paint textured area it is pretty easy to do so. Just feather the j/c out thinly where you stop, a light sanding should blend it all in. If you need to skim an area and then match it to a texture that can be done also by texturing the repair.
 
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Old 06-27-06, 05:19 PM
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Great! Thanks a bunch!!! I now have a weekend project!
 
 

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