Exterior choices

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Old 07-13-06, 12:31 PM
jwr
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Exterior choices

I need some advice. I have cedar t&g siding mounted vertically on my house that has been painted with a latex paint. I would like to refinish. I am in the process of sanding, cleaning, and priming with Cover Stain-oil based primer. Some areas I am sanding down to bare wood and others where the paint is adhered well are basically scuff sanded. I will be priming all areas, bare wood areas will probably get 2 coats of primer. Originally I was going to topcoat with a top quality latex paint flat sheen. I have been hearing alot about latex solid stains. My local paint store (not a big box) highly recommends them. I am wondering if this is a better way to go. My concerns are can I use them over an oil based primer? The walls that I want to stain are the south side and north side-two extremes. How do they hold up under direct sunlight? It was always my assumption that exterior stains were self priming and had to be applied to bare wood. My paint store is telling me that solid stains actually are just like paint but allow some of the grain of the wood to come through. The advantages to the stains are also the quick working times-can be recoated typically in 8-12 hours the store states. Other people I talk to say that stains will be blotchy even after 2 coats. Ideas? Suggestions? Thank you.
 
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Old 07-13-06, 01:46 PM
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I think you are getting mixed messages or product info

Solid stains are solid, like paint
There's no grain showing through
That would be a semi-transparent stain

Stains usually aren't primered under, but some can be

I use oil-based solid stains in problem areas, I can put them over anything
There's no blotchyness...unless you try and get away with one coat

Unless you've got some other issues or concerns you'd like addressed, I'd stick with latex paint though
 
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Old 07-13-06, 02:00 PM
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Thanks for the info. I figured that solid stain is like paint. I thought that using primer under was odd as well. I did discuss with my dealer about an oil based stain. They shied me away from oil. They reasoned that oil doesnt breathe as well as acrylic/latex stain. It almost acts as a moisture barrier on moisture moving from the house out. I have no real concerns, just like to explore my options.
 
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Old 07-13-06, 02:02 PM
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When using light colored latex stains [or paint] over cedar it is always necessary to first prime with oil base to prevent the tannins from bleeding thru.

A solid stain will allow the grain texture [as in rough sawn] to show more than it would with paint. It is unusual for solid stain to peel but it doesn't last as long as paint [less film = less protection]

Neither paint or stain should dry splotchy if applied correctly.
 
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Old 07-13-06, 02:13 PM
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I am using Zinnser Cover Stain which is an oil based primer. One coat on sanded areas and two coats where there is bare wood.
 
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Old 07-13-06, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by jwr
...They reasoned that oil doesnt breathe as well as acrylic/latex stain. It almost acts as a moisture barrier on moisture moving from the house out...
Ha ha ha..
Well now, that's true
But for the most part that does not come into play with most homes

The government is making the PaintCos use ever stringent VOC criteria, and by default most PaintCos probably will be phasing out most oils soon

The "moisture barrier" seems to be the paint salesperson's latest "you can say that..." line
When people ask for oil, and the sales person recommends water-based (and rightly so...it is safer, and oil, or their PaintCo's oil, may not be available in your area anymore)

The salesperson's dilemma:
"What do I do if they still want oil?"
Rather than say "we were told to stop dealing the paint cans full of death that we've been selling for 40 years", the sales mgr or product rep will say: "You can say that....."
I this case "...oil is a vapor barrier and latex is better for breath ability"

It's true, but not applicable in most cases
For example, on the shore here in New England, it's common to find former cottages that were winterized
Now, it's a harsh climate, cold stormy winters, hot humid summers, pretty much moist moist moist all year round
The land of rust and mildew
When these places were winterized, there were no vapor barriers installed (retro-fitted)
So close to the water table, the damp basements or extremely common sand floor crawlspaces, along with the sea breezes can make a house very damp

In these cases, sometimes oil (which is a superior protectant by far) can actually peal up on the outside of a house...not from the outside in, but from the inside out

So, yes, it's true...but not really applicable except under specific circumstances

(btw, with proper precautions, fresh air or respirator, and proper disposal, oils are not technically "paint cans of death"...but it sounds cool though)
 
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Old 07-13-06, 02:51 PM
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Slickshift, I hear you. I live on the south shore of Long Island-a climate very much like your own so I can relate. I think I will be going my original route with my oil primer and latex topcoat. Hopefully, it will stop raining here for more than a day.
 
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Old 07-13-06, 06:28 PM
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Originally Posted by jwr
...Hopefully, it will stop raining here for more than a day.
That would be nice...I'm a little backed up here with exterior work right now, as I'm sure you can gather if you've been getting any of what we have the last two months
So your paint guys could see a bit of what I was talking about I'm sure
Still, it's pretty specific...even around here
It does happen, but not on all the houses
It's not a reason not to use oil unless the house has paint failure due to interior moisture
I'm sure they see that though

I think your plan sounds good
Any problems post up
Good luck...tomorrow should be nice up here, hope it is down there
 
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