Electric Sander? (Wall Preparation for Painting)

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Old 08-30-06, 09:48 PM
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Electric Sander? (Wall Preparation for Painting)

I just took down wallpaper in my home and it was a lot of old paint peeling and rubbing off also the wall is very bumpy like it's was kinda textured that way. Do I sand by hand or can I use a electric sander? Sanding by hand would take me a very long time because I have a lot of wall to cover. By the way I plan on painting the walls. Another thing the wall is plaster.
 
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Old 08-30-06, 09:59 PM
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You can sand by hand or with electric sander. You will need to use a primer/sealer like Zinnser before painting.
 
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Old 08-30-06, 10:10 PM
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Thanks for the quick response. I thought maybe a electric sander might wear a hole in the wall. Guess I was wrong.
 
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Old 08-30-06, 11:01 PM
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If you pass back and forth with the sander, you will not wear a hole in the wall. To wear a hole in the wall I believe you would have to hold it in one place for a while. You will likely want to use a mid-grain sandpaper to remove peeling paint, saving your finer grit for the final sanding. There are electric sanders with dust collecting bags to minimize dust. You might want to hang a sheet over doors to contain dust in the room where you are working. After sanding, you will need to wipe down walls with damp cloth or sponge to remove dust.

If the walls are textured and texture not too deep and/or you have indentions and bumps, you can smooth out walls with drywall compound. Sanding off all the texture would work you to death. Smoothing out walls with drywall compound is easier. Apply a thin coat to fill in and level off. Apply a second coat to fill in what the first coat missed. Then, you can sand or screen walls flat after drywall compound is dry. If you see you need more drywall compound for areas you discover that still need it, you can apply more. Inspect wall and sand or screen with drywall screen after dry. After you are satisfied with your walls and all drywall compound is dry and sanded, apply primer/sealer like Zinnser and then paint.
 
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Old 08-31-06, 06:21 AM
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Latex paints don't always sand well, especially with the heat generated by an electric sander. Expect to change the sandpaper often.

I usually sand walls with a pole sander. When that isn't sufficent I usually skim the walls with joint compound.
 
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Old 08-31-06, 07:08 AM
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Originally Posted by twelvepole
You can sand by hand or with electric sander. You will need to use a primer/sealer like Zinnser before painting.
12pole, which of the many primers that Zinsser makes do you suggest for this application?
 
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Old 08-31-06, 11:31 AM
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electric sander?

Isn't there a primer product out there now that fills in the indentations on textured walls?
 
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Old 08-31-06, 04:03 PM
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Originally Posted by leelator
Isn't there a primer product out there now that fills in the indentations on textured walls?
No
Well, not a good one anyway

Those are best filled with joint compound, sanded, primered, and painted
 
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Old 08-31-06, 06:23 PM
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Originally Posted by leelator
Isn't there a primer product out there now that fills in the indentations on textured walls?

USG 1st coat and other high build primers do a decent job of leveling out the surface on new drywall and are best applied by airless spray. Not really applicable for this job - skim coat of j/c would be better.
 
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Old 09-01-06, 04:55 PM
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Ah yes
I assumed the poster was referring to the Home Depot's Ralf Lauren "texture-leveling" paint for pre painted sufaces
Although it's made for RL texture paint DIYers remorse (what if we don't like it?-You can make it smooth again with this!), the HD sales associates tend to push it as a texture cure-all
It's not
 
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Old 09-01-06, 05:23 PM
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Zinnser's 1-2-3 has universal applications for both indoors & outdoors. It is also available in a tint prep that can be tinted. I love their B-I-N and for covering stains. I like the B-I-N better than the water-based primer/sealer. High Hide products are good too. Our local little hardware stocks the 1-2-3 & B-I-N.
 
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Old 09-02-06, 04:53 AM
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Originally Posted by slickshift
I assumed the poster was referring to the Home Depot's Ralf Lauren "texture-leveling" paint for pre painted sufaces

I keep forgeting that HD [or any big box] sells paint
 
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Old 09-02-06, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
I keep forgeting that HD [or any big box] sells paint
If everyone else did than 1/2 the problems posted here would be gone

< snickers >
 
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