Remove multiple layers of paint on drywall


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Old 09-01-06, 10:45 AM
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Remove multiple layers of paint on drywall

Hi there,
first post here...

I'm facing multiple layers of paint on my drywalls. Since I believe that walls need to breathe and I don't like the relief structure of the paint I like to get rid of it. It has multiple layers of paint and the last layer is kind of elastic, so I don't even think about sanding it.

Is there a smart way to remove the paint or is replacing the drywall the "cheapest" solution?
Thanks
Carl
 
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Old 09-01-06, 10:58 AM
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are you serious?
 
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Old 09-01-06, 11:08 AM
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Annette is not alone in her surprise. I think you may be heading in the wrong direction on this one, I've never heard of anyone scraping paint on drywall - you paint over it and skim coat it with joint compound first if you don't like the texture on it. If anything, I would bet that you would as likely destroy the drywall scraping it as accomplish what you wish.
 
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Old 09-01-06, 11:20 AM
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The previous owners had already the idea of painting over and over with at least 5 layers of different paints. The last one is a screwed up relief structure which is everything but "consistent". Since I will move some walls and I'm not willing to match that mess with my new drywalls I think it's a valid question to ask if there is a way to remove that...
 

Last edited by stickshift; 09-01-06 at 11:25 AM. Reason: removed quoting of entire post
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Old 09-01-06, 11:29 AM
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OK, let me see if I have this straight - you are going to have new pieces of drywall abutting the current, which has a texture you don't like. Am I correct?

If so, I can see your point. I still think scraping is going to cause more harm than good. Is the paint and texture on the old stuff thick enough that you could skim coat it and have it then match some new drywall that was thicker - like 5/8" instead of 1/2"?
 
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Old 09-01-06, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by mitch17
OK, let me see if I have this straight - you are going to have new pieces of drywall abutting the current, which has a texture you don't like. Am I correct?"
correct!

Originally Posted by mitch17
If so, I can see your point. I still think scraping is going to cause more harm than good. Is the paint and texture on the old stuff thick enough that you could skim coat it and have it then match some new drywall that was thicker - like 5/8" instead of 1/2"?
The thickness is no problem at all. It's the messed up relief structure which bothers me. Some areas look like "treated" with a sponge others look brushed...well...I don't like relief at all.
It's a modern house with a great design and I like to draw attention to the design of the house and the furniture and not the walls...know what I mean???...
 
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Old 09-01-06, 11:57 AM
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the cheapest & easiest solution is to skim coat the texture smooth with joint compound. prime it, then paint it. and don't worry - it won't suffocate.
 
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Old 09-01-06, 01:25 PM
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It is better for drywall to be well sealed, it doesn't need to breath. Skim coating over the different textures is probably the best way to go.
 
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Old 09-01-06, 04:46 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
It is better for drywall to be well sealed, it doesn't need to breath. Skim coating over the different textures is probably the best way to go.

I agree

To answer the original question, there is no good way to remove paint from drywall
 
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Old 09-05-06, 06:10 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr
It is better for drywall to be well sealed, it doesn't need to breath. Skim coating over the different textures is probably the best way to go.
...Just to satisfy my curiosity...and have mercy with me because where I come originally from the walls are massive and the do breathy...why should a drywall not breath?
 
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Old 09-05-06, 07:03 AM
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I had this problem. 45 years of paint fell off the ceiling and the walls.

Do not use paint remover. I made this mistake. A strip of paint with paint remover on it landed on my bathtub. See above post.

Your best bet is to buy a tub of drywall compound. First scrape off any loose paint. Fill the uneven areas and sand sand sand. Prime the walls and use a really good quality paint.

A faux finnish will hide imperfections. I used a ragging technique.
 

Last edited by payneg; 09-06-06 at 12:57 AM.
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Old 09-05-06, 07:17 AM
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It's not that drywall shouldn't breathe, it's just that it doesn't need to. It's just ground up rock - gypsum.
 
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Old 09-05-06, 07:32 AM
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Originally Posted by mitch17
It's not that drywall shouldn't breathe, it's just that it doesn't need to. It's just ground up rock - gypsum.
Well...My northwest corner (and if I'm not mistaken that's the critical side on every house when you talk about moisture and midew) had laso multiple layers of paint which just felt off when I vacuumcleaned it. Undereath the drywall is wet (no problem with the roof, BTW) and mildew found the right environment.
If your wall can store and release moisture you will not see anything like that; just my two cents...BUT, I don't like to beat that topic to death...I'm from Europe; things are different there (I didn't say better)
 
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Old 09-05-06, 07:42 AM
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You have a moisture infiltration problem that needs to be found and fixed. Drywall does not tolerate being wet and this could be a breeding ground for dangerous mold. You need to take care of this quickly.
 
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Old 09-05-06, 08:18 AM
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A vapor barrier should be installed between the drywall and the insulation. This prevents moisture from being carried thru the wall.
 
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Old 09-06-06, 08:29 AM
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...like polyethylene? I heard felt hasn't that good of a permeability rating and contains asphalt, too...as far as I know...




removed unneeded quote
 

Last edited by marksr; 09-06-06 at 10:06 AM.
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Old 09-06-06, 10:08 AM
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Tar paper or house wrap goes on the outside underneath siding.
Plastic is installed between the drywall and the insulation. I don't think it is requirement in all areas. Mostly needed in humid climates.
 
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Old 09-06-06, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
...Plastic is installed between the drywall and the insulation... Mostly needed in humid climates.
It's the single biggest reason for paint failures around here
No vapor barrier
Usually on former Summer homes that have been converted to year-round
Well, almost converted, they tend to skimp on the vapor barrier
 
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Old 10-03-06, 09:53 AM
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OK, did it! Drywall compound was the way to go. I kinda filled it with compound and sanded it a bit with that sponch kinda sander to carefully bring back some structur.
Ready for some paint now...

Since some rust and that tar like what-ever-that-is-black-stuff bleeded through the compound I now I need a primer which kicks ass. Could somebody recommend me a product. It's OK to name a product... ;-)

My result is not 100% consistent because one wall I had to move and now doesn't match with the others which show some structure. What would be a nice product to make them look simillar/alike.

THANKS!
 
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Old 10-03-06, 10:18 AM
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You want a sealing primer. I use Zinsser 123.
 
 

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