how to thin oil based primer


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Old 10-19-06, 07:28 PM
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how to thin oil based primer

what do you use to correctly thin oil based primer ?

i bought some and it is way thick like cold temperature syrup gets to be so i cant spread it out very easily and its not soaking into the T1-11 panels very well
what do i use and thanks for any tips on priming/painting pine panels

also what paint type should i put over the oil primer ? and shoudl i completely coat the backside of the panels or just the outside perimeter and the edges?


thanks for anything
 

Last edited by Annette; 10-25-06 at 09:30 AM.
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Old 10-19-06, 08:22 PM
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The can will have the recommended thinner on the back
I also use Penetrol conditioner for "thinning" oils

I normally don't thin primers
That sounds awful thick though
Exactly what primer is it?
 
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Old 10-19-06, 11:46 PM
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it is oil base primer, white, thats it

i cant read the back of the can i got primer all over it from using the primer

one of the ingredients is mineral spirits, i didnt see any other solvent/thinner/reducer in the ingredients list

what is what ? is mineral spirits a reducer or a thinner or what ?



thanks
 
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Old 10-20-06, 03:21 AM
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Well, I meant what brand and specific product as they may have the Material Data Sheet online and we could look it up

It won't be in the ingredients, it'll be in Application, or even Thinning

But that's OK, to be sure, I'd use Penetrol

You'll have to mix up small batches to get the right amount
There are instructions on th can/bottle
Start with a little, add as needed
 
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Old 10-20-06, 05:32 AM
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Be sure to stir the primer well. If the primer was left out in the cold at night it will be thick but will get thinner as it warms so be carefull to not over thin the paint while it is cold.

Both paint thinner/mineral spirits and penatrol will thin the paint. Penatrol is preffered because it doesn't delute the primer.
 
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Old 10-20-06, 07:44 AM
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i had the can mixed on the machine when i bought it, it was in the local hardware store inside warm on the shelf i cant read the label i got primer all over it

how much is penatrol is it expensive ?

never heard of this stuff before, not sure if ill be able to find any in this small farming town or not


thanks for any further
 
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Old 10-20-06, 08:17 AM
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Originally Posted by fast68
how much is penatrol is it expensive ?

It has been a while since I purchased any but it isn't all that expensive. A quart will be more than you need. Most places that sell paint will also have penatrol.

If you can't find any, it is ok to use paint thinner, just use it sparingly. You don't want a primer so thin it doesn't seal the wood well. If a paint can sits out in the cold it will appear thick but when the temp rises it will revert back to it's original consistency.

BTW latex is usually the preffered paint to be applied over the oil primer for your siding.
 
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Old 10-23-06, 08:50 AM
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ok good info

im curious on the latex paint part

what makes latex preferred for coating over oil primer ?

im using this stuff on the exterior wanting to put as durable of paint on it as i possibly can

what would be bad about putting oil based paint on it ? or enamel ?


should i not be using oil primer then ?

how do i make this stuff coat real good and be protected well then ?


i dont want ot have to paint this stuff every couple of years, it is going ot be in alot of full sun and in temps fro around 100 all the way down ot well below freezing each year, rain snow ice you name it we get it all here in central IL, tornados, hail, and other stuff too




thanks
 
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Old 10-23-06, 08:58 AM
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With todays formulation of both oil and latex, latex usually weathers better than oil base will.

Oil base primer does a better job of sealing the wood.

The better paint you use the longer it should hold up. Duration is SWPs top of the line exterior coating but good results can be had with both their super paint and even A-100.

Benjamin Moore also has quality exterior coatings but I'm not as familiar with them. IMO it is best to use the best paint that you can afford. 2 coats are always better than 1
 
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Old 10-23-06, 10:08 AM
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Hey, Randy, give SW a call. You got one in your town. I live in Spfld (small world eh..), and used to know Lauren who ran the store. Not sure if he has retired, but really nice guy. Good Luck!
 

Last edited by stickshift; 10-23-06 at 10:17 AM. Reason: Removed quoting entire post
 

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