Zinseer 1-2-3 Primer Sealer


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Old 10-21-06, 10:29 PM
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Unhappy Zinseer 1-2-3 Primer Sealer

I started to use Zinseer 1-2-3 Primer Sealer to prime drywall and stopped when I had problems with it sagging. I sanded the Zinseer smooth and then recoated the Zinseer and finished the rest of the wall with a regular drywall primer. After two top coats of a dark reddish brown latex wall satin, the wall paint color is uniform and the texture is smooth, but the wall has a noticeably different sheen where it was originally coated with the Zinseer primer sealer. What can I do to make the sheen uniform? I would try another topcoat, but the 2nd topcoat did not seem to make any difference. Thanks for any suggestions.
 
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Old 10-22-06, 05:56 AM
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Welcome to the forums

What brand of paint are you using?
 
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Old 10-22-06, 07:15 AM
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...and what line within the brand too, it could make a difference as to your next step
 
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Old 10-22-06, 08:06 AM
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Zinseer 1-2-3 Primer Sealer

I am using Sherwin Williams ColorAccents Interior Latex Satin (a tinted UltraDeep Base). Based on what its costing me, I assume it must be a SW top-of-the line.
 
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Old 10-22-06, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by fred2006
I am using Sherwin Williams ColorAccents Interior Latex Satin (a tinted UltraDeep Base). Based on what its costing me, I assume it must be a SW top-of-the line.
Yes indeed that is an expensive color. SW makes a PreRite primer for that product that is tinted a gray shade to make your finish work properly. The gray shade is different depending upon final color.

Not sure why you went off reservation on the primer, but your next coat SHOULD make up the difference. It may be a color issue, and not a sheen issue though.

At this point, another coat may work for you. Good luck!
 
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Old 11-01-06, 01:24 AM
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A question regarding the SWP primer - I'm going with the ColorAccents line of their paint as well - a flat TerraCotta color - on a main wall. I take it the rec is to go with their primer to match the paint line and not Kilz or some other brand?
 
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Old 11-01-06, 04:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Cienega32
- I'm going with the ColorAccents line of their paint as well - a flat TerraCotta color - on a main wall. I take it the rec is to go with their primer to match the paint line and not Kilz or some other brand?
That depends on why you are priming
Why are you priming?
 
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Old 11-01-06, 06:25 AM
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Often priming isn't neccesary or previously painted surfaces.
What is on the wall now? What condition is the wall in?
 
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Old 11-01-06, 12:36 PM
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A botched and very splotchy 'suede' paint job that has left a very crappy texture and appearance, areas that need patch work and many nail and screw holes. I figure it's getting primed!
 
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Old 11-01-06, 12:40 PM
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Yep you are right it will need priming. The folks at SWP can direct you to the best primer and tint it to make the top coat cover easier.
 
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Old 11-01-06, 01:16 PM
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So the best approach would be to 'stay in the family' as was mentioned? Reason I ask is because I have some of the Kilz laying around but do/will need more primer anyway. If it's better to stay in the family I'll get more from SWP.

Thanks!
 
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Old 11-01-06, 03:07 PM
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Definitely stay with the SWP primer
 
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Old 11-01-06, 05:20 PM
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Will do - thanks!
 
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Old 11-02-06, 04:19 PM
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Update on painting results

Thanks for all the input -- in case anyone is interested, this is what happened.
A third coat did not seem to cover the difference in sheen (after a couple of days -- see remarks at end). But, since the satin brownish red finish paint was showing alot of imperfections in the wall (which you don't see when you paint a flat latex primer), I used some DAP Premium Lightweight Joint Compound to smooth the imperfections, sanded, cleaned with a tackcloth, coated with American Traditions (Valspar Lowes) High Hiding Primer, and then with the SWP ColorAccent Primer. I was not impressed with the SWP Primer -- it seemed to be a watered down version of their finish paint -- just tinted gray -- I would stick with a better quality primer like American Traditions. However, the SWP finish paint was very impressive -- went on very easy, smooth, and covered in two coats although my decorator said it would required three. I got a few bubbles in the paint down to the first satin brownish red coat. Although I had sanded that coat, the primer did not seem to adhere 100% to that satin coat -- luckily the bubbling reduced as the paint dryed and is relatively inconspicuous. After these additional layers of primer and finish paint, the difference in sheen due to the use of Zinseer primer was noticeably reduced in most areas. Finally, I noticed the difference in sheen seems to be gradually reducing as each day goes by. My recommendation is that, if you can wait, let the paint dry for a couple of weeks (as opposed to a couple of days) before you decide if you have a sheen problem. The finish paint does really seem to have a vastly different drying time depending on the primer you used.
 
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Old 11-03-06, 04:11 PM
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Thanks for the detailed update
Follow ups like this are very helpful
Thanks!
 
 

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