Painting Shutter-type Cabinets-Please Help


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Old 10-23-06, 08:02 AM
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Painting Shutter-type Cabinets-Please Help

Greetings,

I am a newbie seeking advice on how to paint these kitchen cabinets. This is our first house (built in the 1950-60s) and we have some time before moving in to do some work on it. I've taken this cabinet project on as my priority (in addition to closets and other installations). How can I do a good painting job that will 1) build my confidence 2) show my dh that I can do it (smile). Here's a link to a picture of the cabinets:

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c225/lisaquilts2/HomeInspectionVillageCourt008.jpg

The cabinets are currently lightly varnished. I plan to dismount them, sand, prime, and paint them in a bright color. I know to expect quite a bit of work. My concern is the (i don't know what the proper word is) "shuttered" or layered wood slats on the front of the cabinets. How do you paint them? Should I use a brush or roller? I have a 1/4 sheet sander and a Dremel tool for sanding, but how to get the paint in there evenly? I'm concerned because I am committed to a bright color and know that care must be taken. I was even thinking about two different colors (frames one color, inside slats another), so I know to expect a long process and a lot of work. That's fine. I just don't want it to be *wasted* work that I'll have to do over or be thoroughly dissapointed with.


Any advice on materials (paint, brushes, rollers, tape, primers, speciality kitchen paints) would be appreciated. Also, the only major paint store in our town is a Sherwin Williams--we also have a Lowe's.

Take care,
Lisa
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 10-23-06 at 04:31 PM. Reason: Edited url for easier copying and pasting
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Old 10-23-06, 09:06 AM
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Welcome to the forums Lisa

I couldn't get the link to work

Are you cabinet doors louvered? If so spraying is the easiest but it can be painted with a brush. When brushing louvers it is always best to keep an eye on the back side for runs [where the paint drips thru]

After cleaning the cabinets you should sand, dust and then coat them with a solvent based primer to insure adhesion.

Your local SWP store should be able to help you chose which materials and tools will work best for you.

Are you sure you need to take the cabinets down? While it would be easier to refinish them down that is an awfull lot of extra work.
 
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Old 10-23-06, 04:28 PM
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I can't tell you what SW products to use (I work for the compition) but I can say go there before lowes, you will get better advice. I would try rolling then with a very short nap roller, it will take more coats but it will lay out better. Is there a gap on the doors that may allow paint through? if so, you will have to wach for drips coming through those slats.

1) Clean with TSP/water
2) scuff sand for adhesion. 220 gritt very lightly
3) prime. I would use a product like Cover Stain from Zinnser
4) paint with a latex.
 
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Old 10-23-06, 04:58 PM
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Finally got to look at the pic and I believe they are louvers, same on both sides, right?

Both cover stain or BIN from zinnsers are good primers for you cabinets. SWP usually has zinnser products, they also have similiar primers in their label.

I disagree with bclacquer about using latex for a finish. IMO latex enamel just doesn't dry hard enough. I can recomend both oil base enamel and waterborne enamel. IMO the SWP's Proclassic waterborne enamel is worth the extra cost.

I'm not sure how you would gain anything by trying to roll the slats but it is ok to roll flat areas if it makes it easier on you. Expect a little orange peel [texture] from the roller.
 
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Old 10-23-06, 05:37 PM
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Wink

I would first have them stripped by dipping. Then I would have them painted the same way by dipping.
 
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Old 10-23-06, 06:38 PM
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I would hasten to add that I would recomend latex but only a few. For example, Hirshfield's Heavy Duty, and BM Satin Impervo. I would recomend an SW product, but I don't know thier paint line very well, I ussually compete against thier lacquers.
 
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Old 10-23-06, 07:41 PM
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Originally Posted by bclacquer
I would hasten to add that I would recomend latex but only a few. ... and BM Satin Impervo.

Satin Impervo is a waterborne enamel
That's a little different than a latex enamel
Satin Impervo (and other waterborne enamels), is the type of coating marksr was recommending, and what I would recommend also

A latex enamel from Ben Moore would be like...say Super Hide semi-gloss
It'll work for trim/cabs, but it's really a wall paint

The Impervo is miles ahead for trim/cab and other satin/semi finish work
 
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Old 10-23-06, 07:56 PM
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I must beg to differ. BM Satin Impervo is classified as a latex paint.

Waterborne or waterbased enamel are marketing terms that are irrelevant. both Waterborne or waterbased enamels or latex enamls are latex resin basesd; and all use water as the primary solvent. Enamel is merly an additive for hardness. you will find that almost all latex paints have enamel added to them to some amount. this is done so that the label can say "enamel".

I am not stating that any paint that says enamel is good for a durrable finish, there are many other items that go into a paint that affect it; I just happen to run into this quite often.
 
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Old 10-23-06, 08:39 PM
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Thanks for your help! A few more ??s

Hi All,
Thanks so much for your help. I'm going to print off this thread and take it with me to the paint store. Yes, the doors are louvered (that's the word!) and look the same on both sides. I have a few more questions about the process.

1) regarding latex or other paints: are these types of paints generally safe for kitchens or other food areas. Will a latex's hard finish (it *was* the latex that gave the better finish, right?) resist airborne oils, steam, and other food prep stuff?

2) What about kid/safety issues? We have small kids (not that we expect or encourage them to gnaw on the cabinets--especially after I've worked so hard on them) is there an issue with certain types of paint?

3) I've read in another thread that a $2 brush will do a $2 job. What type of brush or roller should I use? I know that it should be a short nap, but does the texture matter? What about those cheapy spongey things or is that just for touch ups? Would a trim brush do the trick?

4) Do you have to apply more than one coat of paint for it to work? If I chose a bright color like green or orange should I tint the primer the same color? Is that possible?

5) Do you paint the insides and shelves of the cabinets or just the parts that face outward?

Thanks again for your help. This has been great!
 
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Old 10-24-06, 05:41 AM
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1) use latex. which one is up to debate but it will last longer and perform better then oils. I would use the BM product, but I don't know where you can get it. I know BM sells to alot of harware stores, you could start looking there.

2)latex is fine for kids. don't let them chew on the cabinets and everything is ok. there are some paints outthere that have a mildicide in them, dedpending on what it is it should be ok. don't add one to the paint. other then that, latex will be fine.

3) I like the yellow cover on the Wizz rollers when I do furniture. it seems to leave the least texture but it takes more coats of paint to cover. My wife perfers a short nap roller. if you spend the $20 on a brush, it will get you a better finish and you ca clean the brush and ue it again and again.

4) if you choose a bright color, you will have to apply more coats. You should get the primer tinted, but that deppends on the color of the top coat. for example reds require a gray primer.

5)totally your call. I have seen both. personally I would do everything. it is more work but it looks better.
 
 

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