project to do


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Old 11-02-06, 11:00 PM
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project to do

Any tips on how to finish drywall. Thanks
 

Last edited by Michaela521; 11-16-06 at 12:09 PM.
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Old 11-03-06, 05:44 AM
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Be sure that all repairs are done and sanded on your old walls prior to texturing. Light weight mud should not be used for taping but is fine for the top coats. Only the wide joints need to be prefilled.

While j/c doesn't need to be thinned to make it work, thinning does make it easier to apply. You don't want to over thin the j/c. I wish I was better at describing how much to thin it, but basically you still want it thick, just thin enough where it spreads easier.

All texture should be primed. Primer will seal the wall making the top coat look better and in some cases can make the finish coat a little more washable.
 
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Old 11-03-06, 12:44 PM
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Is it necessary to dust if I sand imbetween coats. Like let say I say after the first fill coat to remove some imperfections that I might have made. Then should I use a blower or perhaps a moistened rags/paper towel to remove the dust. Thanks
 
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Old 11-03-06, 01:18 PM
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There shouldn't be a need to sand the first coat of j/c. Any ridges can be scraped/knock down with your broad knife.
Dust will prevent both j/c and paint from bonding. Dusting with a dry brush or rag is usually sufficent.
 
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Old 11-03-06, 03:59 PM
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[QUOTE=Michaela521]
First prefill gaps with joint compound like where sheetrock meets sheetrock and wall meets ceiling then let this dry overnight.
[QUOTE]
Hmmm...this I don't do

[QUOTE=Michaela521]
Next I apply my tape. I was planning on using joint compound for this or perhaps a light weight joint compound would be better
[QUOTE]
Regular J/C is fine for this step

[QUOTE=Michaela521]
but how much should I thin the compound, to what consistency. I read that I should THIN the compound inorder to help the tape apply better.
[QUOTE]
I don't thin the first coat
[QUOTE=Michaela521]
I use a 6" knife for all this and also for cornerbeads, inside corners etc..
[QUOTE]
I start with a 4"

[QUOTE=Michaela521]
After this dries overnight inorder to apply better and sand easier I will switch to a light weight all purpose joint compound for my fill coat . I use lightwight all purpose compound for the last two coats that are applied with a 8" to 10" knife and then a 12" knife for the last coat.
[QUOTE]
I like using light weight for the last coat(s)
I'm pretty sure I use an 8 then a 10, though I'll check the sizes when I go into the shop (I was using them today so they are drying)
I don't think I use a 12"

[QUOTE=Michaela521]
Then I sand with a 150 grit paper.
[QUOTE]
That's a little coarse for a final sand
I'd use something finer
180 or 220
In fact, I'd suggest a (fine) sanding screen

[QUOTE=Michaela521]
Next goes a primer coat on my already painted walls and my walls that I just put in. I think I should apply a primer to my walls that are already painted becuase I will be texturing it and I thought it might be best to prime this but perhaps it doesn't matter. Instead of the primer perhaps I should just apply one or two coats of paint to the walls only the amount that is needed inorder for coverage.
[QUOTE]

There's probably no need to primer untextured, un-repaired, previously painted walls
Just the repaired (sheetrock, compound) parts

But if the repairs are large and/or many and/or there's a big color difference between the primer, wall color on there now, and the color it's going to be, it might be a good idea to prime the entire wall for consistency and a clean slate
 
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Old 11-03-06, 04:01 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
There shouldn't be a need to sand the first coat of j/c. Any ridges can be scraped/knock down with your broad knife.
Dust will prevent both j/c and paint from bonding. Dusting with a dry brush or rag is usually sufficent.
That's how I do it
I knock it down on the first coat

I do like that dry swiffer on a stick thingie for dusting
Two thumbs up for that thing
 
 

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