a question for the pros re:prep


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Old 11-11-06, 04:39 PM
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a question for the pros re:prep

Hello,

I'm a painting contractor in Upstate NY. I recently was sub'd by a large builder to paint some very upscale homes (3 stage crown, mdf built-ins, 7" base, the works). Here is my question. There is another "old-timer" that also works for this sub and he and I disagree on the amount of prep that is the responsibilty of the painter versus the trim carpenters. It is his belief that he should have to do minimal prep (fill nail holes and caulk and maybe point up walls with dings). He never sands MDF cut or routed edges(or primes them for that matter). I, on the other hand, will sand everything and will either seal the routed edges with vinyl spackle or joint compound and then prime with a good oil based primer, typically Pittsburgh interior speed-hide oil based. The difference is of course time. He can blast through a room while I'm still prepping.

Another thing he does is to not use a drywall primer on the walls, instead he will either hit the walls and lid with Pittsburgh 6-70 flat latex white and then paint color over that.

So what is the general consensus? I'm thinking that I'm right in that it is part of the painting process and not up to the trim carpenters. They aren't leaving huge gaps and mistakes and often time they will fill seams if they are to big. The difference in the quality of the final product is only noticeable in a few areas. Usually, in the right light you can see the seam/nailhole sheen diff in the ceiling and of course the MDF where the fibers swell so bad it is like 60 grit sandpaper.

i'm not going to change the way I do my prep because I, and my clients, are happy with the results. I'm more curious to what other pros feel is the level of prep expected by painters/trim carpenters.

thanks!
kdb
 
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Old 11-11-06, 07:23 PM
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Hi there
Welcome to the forum

Originally Posted by imkdb
Here is my question.
OK

Originally Posted by imkdb
It is his belief that he should have to do minimal prep (fill nail holes and caulk and maybe point up walls with dings). He never sands MDF cut or routed edges(or primes them for that matter).
I suppose it technically depends on the contract
But really those should be sanded and primed

Originally Posted by imkdb
I...sand everything ...seal the routed edges with vinyl spackle or joint compound and then prime with a good oil based primer, typically Pittsburgh interior speed-hide oil based.
Sounds good

Originally Posted by imkdb
Another thing he does is to not use a drywall primer on the walls, instead he will either hit the walls and lid with Pittsburgh 6-70 flat latex white and then paint color over that.
That's bad....real bad
I'm sure he will tell you he's never had a problem doing that also
Trust me, he's creating problems down the line for homeowners and repainters

H e ' s never had a problem because the problem shows up after he's long gone

Originally Posted by imkdb
So what is the general consensus?
Keep doing what you are doing
Personally I like this quote from an acquaintance:

Originally Posted by Brushslingers
Your name is all you really have in life... protect it like treasure
 
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Old 11-12-06, 08:47 AM
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I agree with doing the job right!! While others can do it quicker, cheaper and maybe more profit there is a lot of satisfaction in doing the job right. Sooner or later people [including GCs] will notice the difference. A lot of folks don't realize what a sub par paint job is until they see a top notch job.

BTW - I would rather that the carpenters not prefill any of their bad cuts - it usually takes me more time to make it look right than it would if I did it from scratch.
 
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Old 11-12-06, 08:04 PM
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This kind of problem actually comes up quite a bit in the paint store... from my experience, the painter usually gets the blame. Alot of time, the customer doesn't know any better, and the painter was the last one to touch it, so he's the one the screwed it up. You are doing it exactly the way I would do it. In the end, you'll be getting the call backs.

And the second part, to me, it really depends on what type of finish you are putting back on top of the 6-70. If it's flat, then, theoretically, you shouldn't have any problems. But, even then, pittsburgh has drywall sealers that are more than likely cheaper than 6-70.(can't remember the number, i think it's 6-2 or 6-7)

But if you are putting something with some sheen on top of it, you will probably have some problems.
 
 

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