Can you allow latex paint to freeze


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Old 11-15-06, 01:48 PM
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Can you allow latex paint to freeze

I know that I've read notices on cans of latex paint saying that it shouldn't be allowed to freeze, but what about part used cans? This is a big deal to me since I'm looking to winterize my upstate NY house and have a bunch of part-used cans of latex paint - if I can leave them there over winter when I turn off the heat and drain the pipes it would be great. What do you think, not recommended for full cans but OK for partials - surely folk must leave cans of latex out in their sheds over winter? Any comments apopreciated!
 
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Old 11-15-06, 02:49 PM
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the short answer is no. do not let any latex freeze.

the long answer is maybe. some of the better latex paints can go through a few freeze/thaw cycles before they get all messed up, however, it is not recomended by any paint manufacture to allow latex to freeze and they will not stand behind the product. even if it does appear to thaw just fine.

the best thing to do with partcial cans is to pour them off into smaller airtight containers and store them in an area where they will not freeze. if you store a half full gallon can in an area that does not freeze, it could still rot, there is just too much air in the can.
 
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Old 11-15-06, 04:28 PM
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No.

Yes, people do leave partial cans out to freeze. But the paint isn't any good after that.

BTW - why would it be bad for a full can to freeze but not a partial? What do you think happens to the paint after the can is opened, that will protect the paint?
 
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Old 11-15-06, 05:03 PM
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Im in agreement w/BC.

Short answer, NO.

However, some better grade paints can tolerate Freeze/Thaw better than others. If you get back to your place, and the paint is like cottage cheese, or wont mix together, its scrap.

Best to put it in the basement or somewhere it wont freeze. Cold is ok, freezing is not.
 
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Old 11-16-06, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by bclacquer
the short answer is no. do not let any latex freeze.

the long answer is maybe. some of the better latex paints can go through a few freeze/thaw cycles before they get all messed up, however, it is not recomended by any paint manufacture to allow latex to freeze and they will not stand behind the product. even if it does appear to thaw just fine.

the best thing to do with partcial cans is to pour them off into smaller airtight containers and store them in an area where they will not freeze. if you store a half full gallon can in an area that does not freeze, it could still rot, there is just too much air in the can.
Anyone know how long latex paint can be stored and reused if it hasn't been frozen and been kept in a stable env such as a basement. I've been told up to 7 years. Some say longer. Is this correct?
 
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Old 11-16-06, 02:52 PM
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Originally Posted by jj32
Anyone know how long latex paint can be stored and reused if it hasn't been frozen and been kept in a stable env such as a basement. I've been told up to 7 years. Some say longer. Is this correct?

It is hard to say. if the conditions are right I suppose paint could last indefenitely in a sealed container. I think I have used latex paint that was 10 yrs old and still usuable but I've also had paint a few months old that wasn't fit to use.

Generally latex paint formulas improve most every year so you don't really ever want to store paint for a long time. Basically if the paint appears good after storage, it is - might need straining though.
 
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Old 11-16-06, 05:45 PM
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Short answer = no
Real answer = might work, might not...might go up OK, might fail later
Realistic answer = don't put up any paint that has a greater chance of failing than known good paint
 
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Old 11-16-06, 06:39 PM
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Originally Posted by jj32
Anyone know how long latex paint can be stored and reused if it hasn't been frozen and been kept in a stable env such as a basement. I've been told up to 7 years. Some say longer. Is this correct?

If you have old paint and want to know if it is good, there are some quick easy checks. first oopen the can and look at it. if it does not look like paint then it is no good. I have seen oatmeal, crystals, dried scum, and all sorts of other stuff. second, smell it. Latex paint will rot, and that will create an odor, you will know. lastly, feel it. latex paint should have a smooth feel to it, not grainy. if it looks bad, smells bd or feels funky it is no good.
 
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Old 11-17-06, 06:04 AM
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Yes, touch, smell, are all excellent indicators of the products condition. I would discourage a taste test though. I don't even think fresh paint is all that tasty.
 
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Old 11-17-06, 06:59 AM
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Actually I make a mean tuna salad with Ben Moore's AquaVelvet Linen White


















(official disclaimer: j/k!)
 
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Old 11-17-06, 10:33 AM
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Many thanks folks for the good replies. The advice I'm taking is that my plan to leave the cans of paint to freeze isn't a good one! Really makes me want to open up all those cans and either pour them off or discard rather than simply move them to a place that will not freeze. I guess if I have the formula then it's not that big of a deal if a I need to buy a quart for touch-up work.
 
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Old 11-17-06, 03:48 PM
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Don't pour out left over unwanted paint I'm sure you could find someone willing to take/use free paint
 
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Old 11-20-06, 10:29 AM
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I meant pour off into a smaller container as suggested, But the idea of offering left over paint for free is very interesting - I might look into Craigslist.com to see if I can give some of it away. Again many thx.
 
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Old 11-21-06, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by limey01
I meant pour off into a smaller container as suggested, But the idea of offering left over paint for free is very interesting - I might look into Craigslist.com to see if I can give some of it away. Again many thx.
Be careful how you try to dispose of liquid paint. Giving it away is appealing, but make sure that you understand how to ship it.

You must ship ground freight. You must fill out MSDS sheets unless you would invite a $10,000 fine for shipping MSDS w/out paperwork. You must had lid clamps or other way of securing the lid.
Must be in an approved shipping container.

I would just open the can, pour in some kitty litter, let it dry out, then dispose of it. THIS IS ONLY FOR LATEX. Oil base, you may see if your county has a disposal day for old paint. Otherwise, you need to either use it, or let the can fully dry out for disposal.

Good luck!
 
 

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