oil base or latex


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Old 11-26-06, 11:05 AM
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oil base or latex

I purchased a used corner entertainment stand that had been previously bought from naked furniture. The original owners painted the whole thing with a crappy latex paint. I'm stripping the top, crown molding and shelves, and going to stain them, and I want to paint the rest. I'm sanding the painted surfaces. Can I get by using a good quality satin latex (used for trim molding, etc.) or do I
HAVE to use oil base paint. I hate working with oil base.
Your thoughts appreciated in advance.
Janice
 
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Old 11-26-06, 01:24 PM
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Oil base enamel dries a LOT harder than latex enamel, waterborne enamel is a close 2nd. Depending on how much use [wear & tear] the painted surfaces get, some of the better latex enamels will be ok providing they are given enough time to cure. I highly recomend SWP's proclassic waterborne enamel.
 
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Old 11-26-06, 01:26 PM
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thanks for the reply. what is swp? sherwin williams?
 
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Old 11-26-06, 01:34 PM
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yep, SWP = sherwin williams paints
 
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Old 11-27-06, 09:46 PM
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If you want to get a even better looking finish... then use BenMoores waterborne satin impervo(product 314)

Actually, both products look nice, and with moderate wear and tear, they should do a good job. Although, nothing is going to hold up like oil.
 
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Old 11-28-06, 08:47 AM
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The secret to success in waterborne or latex paints is the same as with alkyd paint. The preparation needs to be excellent, and the paint needs to be allowed to cure properly. Although alkyd paint will generally cure in 24 hours, waterborne or latex paints need 4 - 7 days to be completely ready for hard use.

I have found that waterborne or latex paints perform as well as alkyd paint in almost every environment in general use. The high chair that I painted for my two grandsons has survived both of them with the finish still intact.

Hope this helps.
 
 

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