Preparing to Paint - Sanding

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Old 11-27-06, 05:34 PM
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Preparing to Paint - Sanding

I just bought a used wooden bed. The original paint is a very dark brown. This is my first time sanding. I just tried to sand using an eletric hand sander using "very fine grit" paper. I noticed that none of the old dark brown paint came off. I want to paint it white. Am I using the correct sand paper?

Any tips would be very appreciated.

Thanks.
 
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Old 11-27-06, 08:27 PM
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I would use a coarser grit, more on the order of 60 or 80 to remove paint. It would be faster and more effective to strip the paint.
 
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Old 11-27-06, 08:48 PM
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I would prime it with an oil or shellac based primer, and wouldn't worry about trying to get off all the old paint.
 
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Old 11-27-06, 09:01 PM
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I agree - as long as the brown paint is in good shape, I see no reason to sand, just prime and paint.
 
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Old 11-28-06, 05:53 AM
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Me three There is no need to remove the brown as long as it is in good shape. Just lightly sand it all and use a good solvent based primer. it can then be painted with latex, oil base or waterborne enamel.
 
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Old 11-28-06, 07:16 AM
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Also, as this bed is "very old" as you put it, sanding old paint carries its own risks. I wouldn't do it, just clean well with simple green, prime it, paint it, and be done with it.

Too many health concerns with sanding old paint unless you are properly trained.
 
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Old 12-03-06, 01:34 PM
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White Paint

Thank you so much. Great advice. One more question, we are going to paint it white. What would you recommend?
 
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Old 12-03-06, 01:45 PM
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White paint

Prime first with a good solvent based primer. It can be top coated with latex, oil base or waterborne enamel. Oil base enamel will dry to the hardest finish but will yellow with time. Waterborne dries almost as hard as oil base and doesn't yellow but is the most expensive of the 3. As always you will find the best paints [and advice] at your local paint store.
 
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Old 12-03-06, 01:58 PM
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White Paint

We asked the guy at Home Depot and he recommended the "Interior Semi-Gloss Enamel" but when we tried this, it seemed a little sticky after it completly dried (1 week). Not real sticky but a little. We have other furniture that is white, and the paint seems nice and smooth.

How can we get this same affect? Simply using the advice of the previous post? Can you also explain why this semi gloss enamel seems a little sticky?

Thanks.
 
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Old 12-03-06, 02:40 PM
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go to a real paint store

Latex enamels don't dry as hard as oil base or waterborne. The cheaper latex enamels are worse. Big box stores are seldom a good place to buy paint as they try to sell cheap = lower grade of paint.

Both a oil base and waterborne enamels [in a quality brand] will give good results. I can highly recomend SWPs proclassic waterborne enamel. Their oil base enamel is also good but will yellow some over time. SWP's better latex enamels while not as good as waterborne or oil are way superior to the latex enamels you will find at HD.
 
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Old 12-03-06, 04:27 PM
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Survivor - yes getting great results is a simple as following Mark's advice. You will be amazed at how well the SWP waterbourne enamel flows and finishes.

I will add one thing to Marks's advice: pay the $$ for a good brush. Cheap brushes are a total waste of paint and your time.
 
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Old 12-03-06, 06:35 PM
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The "sticky" stuff is a cheap enamel
Go to the paint store and get a good "waterborne" enamel
Sherwin Williams Pro Classic, or Ben Moore's Impervo
...and a good brush too


The paint store (not a paint dept.) is a much better place for paint tools, products, and advice
 
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Old 12-03-06, 06:46 PM
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Great Advice

Thanks for the help...
 
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