Huge undertaking.


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Old 11-28-06, 07:45 AM
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Question Huge undertaking.

My husband and I are going to be remodeling the interior of our home one room at a time, starting with the guest bath.

*wallpaper - it's everywhere and I want it GONE. I've lurked and read archived posts and discovered there are a myriad of things to do about this problem. I don't want to paint over it, I do want to pull it down. Am I correct in understanding that once it's down the walls should be skimmed and smoothed/sanded, then primed, then painted?
*POPCORN CEILING - I hate this stuff, and again, it's EVERYWHERE and I want it gone. As I'm reading here it's basically a spray and scrape operation, but VERY messy. Once it's down, the ceilings must be skimmed and sanded, then primed and painted?
*Oak Paneling - it's in the living room. The good stuff, truly wood. I don't mind it except it's too dark. If I were to paint it, how would I go about doing that? What about restaining it to a lighter color than what it currently is?
*Cabinets - ours are chipped, not peeling, but definitely chipped. What's the best way to repaint the cabinets? They're currently BRIGHT WHITE and husband and I aren't too fond of the look.

Ok, I guess that's all for now. I'll try to keep my queries in as few posts as possible so as not to clutter up the forums.

Thanks!
 

Last edited by shimmeringdream; 11-28-06 at 12:28 PM.
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Old 11-28-06, 08:37 AM
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Make sure the paper is down, wash the wall thoroughly to remove all paste, spackle any defects, prime and paint.

Pretty much the same for the ceiling.

Paneling to be painted, clean thoroughly with mineral spirits to remove all the grease, grit, and grime of life. Rub thoroughly with a scotchbrite pad to knock down the sheen, prime with top quality prime and paint. You may need to fill nail holes from the original installation.

If you want to stain the panels a lighter color, you would need to strip it all first.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 11-28-06, 10:36 AM
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Thank you so much for your rapid response!


How would I go about stripping it, and would I need to sand afterward?
 
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Old 11-28-06, 11:31 AM
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Most paneling doesn't strip well due to the thin veneer layer of wood. Paint stripper is the usual method to remove a finish and yes it would need to be sanded after stripping.

You may be able to sand out the chips in the cabinets and then prime and paint.
 
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Old 11-28-06, 11:34 AM
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sand the chips as in smooth the rough edges etc. and then P/P? I hadn't considered that.

Oil or Latex based paint and primer? Or either?


edit: Thankyou for your response, I appreciate all the assistance I can get before I really sink my teeth into this.
 
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Old 11-28-06, 11:59 AM
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Originally Posted by shimmeringdream
Oil or Latex based paint and primer? Or either?

Depends on what type of paint is on it now and what you intend to top coat it with. Latex primer is probably ok, especially if they are currently painted with latex.

There is a sticky at the top of the painting forums that explains how to determine the paint type.
 
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Old 11-28-06, 11:59 AM
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I already read that and will be checking into it for sure. Thank you!
 
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Old 11-28-06, 09:31 PM
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I did 4 rooms of popcorn with my wifeover a long weekend. All you need is lots of dropcloths, a vacuum and a hat. We also shared a bottle of bubbly when we finally got all that crap removed. A prime coat and a couple of coats of flat white ceiling paint and the rooms look great.

If you have solid oak paneling, I suggest doing whatever you can to lighten it and not paint it. If for no other reason than resale. Try one of the commercial strippers and a bit of sanding in an inconspicuous spot. If you don't like the outcome, you can always paint.
 
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Old 11-29-06, 10:28 AM
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the paneling is one of the things that intimidates me. The paneling, the showers need to be retiled, and the cabinets all give me the heebie jeebies at the prospect of doing them.
I know they CAN be done, it's just a matter of how I do it. ^.^
 
 

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