Painting Tools


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Old 12-13-06, 01:53 PM
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Painting Tools

I have a front formal living/dining room that is ~14x28, two stories tall,and has textured walls/ceilings. My husband and I would like to paint it ourselves. However, we're not sure of whether to use rollers or a paint sprayer (or something else out there that we don't know about). We want to be efficient so the sprayer appeals to us, but we don't know if the fact that we have textured walls/ceilings limits us in terms of the best tool(s) to use. Thanks!
 
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Old 12-13-06, 02:18 PM
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It may depend on the type of texture you have, so perhaps you would want to describe it in more detail. Is it the medium "popcorn" texture that is like a bunch of small styrofoam pebbles embedded in texture? Or is it a type of stomp texture with very small peaks like a mountain range? And are the peaks sharp (large) or smooth (small).

If the texture breaks off in the roller, I prefer to spray textured ceilings, but that would mean masking off the entire room from overspray and removing all the belongings. And you'd need a movable rolling scaffolding platform. Our resident painters will have more ideas, but in the meantime tell us more about the texture!
 
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Old 12-13-06, 02:39 PM
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The texture is knocked down...it's actually very smooth as far as texture is concerned. It's definitely "roller-able"...we've used a roller in other rooms (they all have the same texture). The issue just becomes getting all of the nooks and crannys, and I don't know how well sprayers get into nooks and crannys. We are doing the painting before ripping out the carpet and replacing it with hardwood floor, so we weren't going to cover up the carpet at all before painting. We were just going to cover the larger pieces of furniture rather than removing them from the room. However, now that I think about it, some areas where we're leaving the carpet (i.e. the stairs), we would need to cover if we used the sprayer.
 
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Old 12-13-06, 03:58 PM
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It sounds to me like your ceiling is "rollable" like you thought. I'm not sure that spraying it would end up saving you any time or not, since you would have to do a lot of covering and masking. Plus learning how to use the sprayer and then cleaning it out all take time too. It might be different for a professional who sprays all the time.

If you can get a rollable scaffold, one person could cut the perimeter of the ceiling with a brush while the other person uses a second rollable scaffold to roll the ceiling. You'd want plenty of planks to make a wide area to stand on.

I prefer to paint out of a 5 gallon bucket with a roller screen. Painting out of a bucket will speed things up a LOT. At least it does for me- perhaps that would help you as well. Roller pans are a joke when painting large rooms. You spend half your time refilling the pan. And with your texture, you'd probably want a 1/2" nap I'm guessing to get good coverage. Obviously, you'll want an extendable paint pole for your roller. They're worth every penny.

I'm sure the real painters will chime in soon. I've done a lot of painting but its not my favorite thing to do. Its too much like work.
 
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Old 12-13-06, 08:13 PM
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I seldom do any spraying in an occupied home - it just isn't cost efficent. Overspray has a nasty habit of traveling thru the home everything needs to be covered or sealed off.

I would recomend a 3/4" nap for the ceiling, 1/2" should work fine for the walls.I also prefer to paint out of a 5 gal bucket w/roller screen-grid. IMO it is both easier and quicker. Applying a heavy coat of paint both makes for good coverage and a well lubricated [with paint] brush/roller is easier to use.

Scaffolding will make the job easier but it can be done with ladders. Roller poles come in various sizes with the longest being 8' closed - 16' extended. Don't automatically get a long pole because it will reach the ceiling - you have to have room to work with it too. Often a shorter pole working off of scaffolding or ladder works better.
 
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Old 12-13-06, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
I'm sure the real painters will chime in soon.
is that as opposed to fake painters?
 
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Old 12-13-06, 08:17 PM
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heh heh, yeah! I'm a fake painter- an impostor. LOL


--I'm so good, I do most things twice!
 
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Old 12-13-06, 08:28 PM
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I'd recommend brushes and rollers rather than spraying

Good quality tools will help quite a bit
I'd recommend Purdy or Corona brushes, and some good 50/50 wool/poly roller sleeves, or at least Purdy White Doves
The Wooster Sherlock roller cage should only be about 6 bucks, so I'd recommend that also

The Wooster positive lock extensions are probably some of the best
(Also under the Wooster Sherlock name)
I think you'll want the 8 foot, expandable to 16', for the ceiling and the high parts of the walls
It's pretty heavy though
You may want to switch to the 4 foot (expands to 8'), or even the 2 foot (to 4") for the low parts
If you get the scaffolding, you may not need the 8-16

I'd suggest a mini roller (sometimes called a "hot dog") also
A 4" little roller, that has nap on the ends to get into corners
Shur-Line has the best, but you'll just be using it for ceiling and maybe side wall cut-ins...maybe an OK one will do
They have little paint trays for these, but they don't work too well
Get the mini grid that goes in the cut bucket (paint pot)

For this type of project, I'd "mini-roller" the cut-in on the ceiling
A mini-roller on a pole is the quickest and easiest way to paint the edges of a high (or any) ceiling
Some paint will get on the walls, but that's OK (unless you are just painting the ceiling, then it's a no-no)
Roll the rest and be careful, it'll get heavy, and that pole is pretty long

When doing the walls, there's no better way to cut in the ceiling lines than with a brush and a steady hand
A nice Purdy (like the XL) or Corona Cortez 2&1/2 inch sash (angle) brush is probably the better choices
You'll need ladders or scaffolding to get up there
I don't know if a big step ladder will do it
really big, like a 12 footer might
If you use extension ladders, be safe

Cut in on the sides of the walls will be easy if you have a mini roller on a pole, or use the brush if you don't
Cut in on the bottom will be by brush (unless you are also painting the trim down there, then mini-roll the wall...zoom, zoom, zoom)

The naps should be at least 1/2 inch
The roller tray (and liners), get the "deep dish" kind
(I don't know what they are really called, but they are the same outline as a regular roller tray, but deeper and made of black plastic-get the right liner for them if you find them)
The grids in the fives the guys are talking about work well
IMO they are more for pros (who need more speed), and can be a little sloppy for DIYers
But use your judgment, they can save time

The paint should be a quality paint from a paint store (not a paint dept.)
It'll make this project go faster, smoother, and look better
 
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Old 12-31-06, 08:08 AM
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I have painted for 46 years, and PERSONALLY like to use the LARGE roller pans, with liner, and I place it on top a four wheeled rolling cart that stands approx. 30' high. Yesterday my wife and I painted a room 15 X 20 with 9 foot ceiling in less than about 40 minutes. We have found over the years that it is to easy to get paint on the roller frame when we have used a bucket, and such makes for DRIPS. Yesterday we fill the large roller pan 3 times, from a 5-gallong can of paint, and with the rolling cart the paint was always near by, and NO bending over to load our rollers. We rarely use a cover longer than 3/8", but then again we rarely paint heavy textured surfaces.

I am NOT a big fan of spraying unless your are a pro with pro equipment. I am speaking from a home owners view, and home owners usually have furniture in the room which makes spraying much more difficult.

I enjoy painting, and know FIRST hand that preparing the surface, cutting and triming is key to a nice job. I have NEVER understood why someone would paint right over the switch and outlet covers rather than taking same off. Why spend good money on paint and supplies, plus the time you spend doing the actual painting and not DETAIL your work. This house we are flipping had paint on every cover, light fixture, phone jack, stair railing brackets, you name it. WHAT AN UGLY PAINT JOB, IT WAS.

Just my opinion,


Dale
Indy
 
 

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