what colour is cornice normally painted?


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Old 12-29-06, 04:59 PM
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what colour is cornice normally painted?

do you normally paint cornice the roof white like the roof or something different?
 
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Old 12-29-06, 06:36 PM
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This is an exterior cornice? What is your exterior color scheme? Is house stone, brick, vinyl, or other material? Is this a turn-of-the-century home? A historical home? Are there other homes similar to yours in the area? What architectural style? Without knowing more, it is difficult to tell you more.

If it is a red brick home with white window trim, then cornice would likely be painted white. If painting a Victorian and using color scheme from that era and cornice features intricate details, then it might be decoratively significant to set it off with a color from your exterior color scheme. Some historic areas have restrictions on what colors can be used on exteriors: not just one color; not too many colors; no bright or obtrusive colors. If you live in such an area, you might want to check out any restrictions.

Typically, exterior colors are suppose to complement the style of the home and complement the overall color schemes of the street. A simple basic rule of thumb is to pick three colors--walls, trim, and accent. Don't forget the roof color factors in, too.

Because you have a cornice, I am guessing you have an older home. Knowing the style would be helpful. Perhaps it is a Federal style which often featured cornices. Cornices are usually painted the same color as other trim on the home.

If Georgian or Federal style trim and cornices were painted a shade of white or ivory. Walls were neutral grays, beiges, or white. Shutters were usually dark.

On Queen Anne and Victorian style homes you might find rich reds, browns, greens, or rusts on trim or walls. These dark colors were used to highlight the architectural features of the homes. Keeping similar elements on the exterior the same color provides unity and symmetry without too much busyness going on.

If you have a Gothic cottage style home, grays, tans, and beiges were popular. Colonial Revival homes usually had classic cream or white colored trim. Tans, grays, and greens were popular among post WWII bungalows.

Now that you are likely confused, a safe color for exterior cornices is the same color as your trim. We look forward to hearing more.
 
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Old 12-30-06, 03:18 AM
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as far as i know, cornice is on the interior of every home in the corner of the walls on the roof. i dunno where else its located but thats where mine is.
 
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Old 12-30-06, 05:31 AM
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Do you mean crown moulding? It is a piece of wood trim at the top of the wall next to the ceiling. Occasionally it is made with plaster.

If this is what you have, it is usually painted with the trim paint [enamel - doors, windows, etc] Sometimes it's painted with the ceiling paint.
 
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Old 12-30-06, 11:16 AM
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Interior moldings are best all painted the same.
 
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Old 12-30-06, 01:03 PM
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i never heard of crown mouldings, i wish they would use standard names across the world, would makes things so much easier for everyone. i think i will paint it the same colour as ceiling like the rest of the house.
 
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Old 12-30-06, 02:29 PM
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Those who have beautiful crown moldings are lucky. Painting the same as trim, if painting with oil or latex semi-gloss, will help make crown stand out. Crown molding adds a touch of class to a room.
 
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Old 12-31-06, 05:04 AM
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I'm curious

What is your "cornice" made of?
 
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Old 12-31-06, 09:49 AM
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This link will take you to some illustrations of 'cornice' ('crown') moldings.

http://www.sfvictoriana.com/details/index_11.htm

These molding are installed where wall meets ceiling. Their original purpose was to hide gaps between walls and ceilings. Now, they are decorative. They add a decorative element to a room and can be a single molding or multiple moldings stacked to provide detail. Usually they are sized based on ceiling height, so larger moldings are found in homes with higher ceilings. Moldings can be wood or plaster, but in today's market there are plastic moldings availabe. Both molded plaster and plastic offer opportunities for lots of fancy detail. Too, the plastic moldings can bend around curved walls.
 
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Old 12-31-06, 04:25 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
What is your "cornice" made of?
plaster. http://www.gyprock.com.au/Gyprock/View.asp?Category=Plastering+Solutions&PageType=Stylish+Cornice+Solutions&section=DefaultPage&ProductList=True&topItem_name=Plastering+Solutions&sub_item=Stylish+Cornice+Solutions
 
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Old 12-31-06, 06:23 PM
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Very nice product. Have they been painted before? If not, you will likely want to prime.
 
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Old 01-01-07, 04:00 AM
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I've painted these types of crown moulding before [I see they are actually called cornice ] A few times they were painted with the ceiling but most often with enamel to match the woodwork. If previously unpainted they will need a latex primer first.
 
 

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