Painting hot wall


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Old 12-30-06, 01:10 PM
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Painting hot wall

I have a room adjacent to a fireplace. Part of one wall gets warm when the fire is lit. Efforts to paint this part of the wall have been unsuccessful. With a short time of application the paint begins to flake and fall off. How do I prepare this part of the wall so that it will take paint? Or any other suggestions as to how I might solve this problem. The part of the wall affected is about four square feet.
 
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Old 12-30-06, 01:25 PM
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What type of fireplace? Freestanding?
 
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Old 12-30-06, 02:24 PM
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And what is the wall made of?
 
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Old 12-30-06, 03:07 PM
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Painting Hot Wall

This is an old cottage (laborers, in Southern Ireland) - over 80 years old. Walls of stone (local, limestone). I'm not sure what you mean by free-standing. The fireplace is in the center of the house leading up to wide chimney. One of the sides of the chimney abuts the wall of the room I want to paint. The wall gets hot at that point. Not very well explained by me, sorry.
 
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Old 12-30-06, 05:23 PM
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So this fieplace is open on three sides, not just to the front.

Does this wall get too hot to touch with your hand or just very warm to the touch? Have you noticed any dampness on the wall in the summer or other times when there isn't a fire?

Have you had a sweep or fireplace expert check the back of the firebox? The wall shouldn't get that hot. I wonder if the back of the firebox has a crack or other damage.
 
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Old 12-30-06, 05:56 PM
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Do you have moisture issues on the exterior of that wall. Moisture can cause paint to pop.
 
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Old 12-30-06, 08:00 PM
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Warm to the touch only. No problem in summer. No dampness.
 
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Old 12-31-06, 05:56 AM
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I have a wood stove in my living rm that sits on quarry tile and has brick surrounding the thimble, the rest is drywall. With a hot fire the drywall gets very hot [to touch] but I have no problems at all with the paint.

That makes may think that it might not be a heat problem. What kind of condition is the wall substrate in? If you paint in the summer is the paint fine until you build a fire?
 
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Old 12-31-06, 07:37 AM
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sounds like you need local advice , check with local painters . handyman or paint store . if its a common building method do what the locals do
 
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Old 12-31-06, 10:28 AM
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The only other thought is that when painting over natural stone like fieldstone that moisture vapor in stone is drawn to the surface by the excess heat and the paint gets spalled off. Perhaps a heat shield or brick or other could be installed to resolve the problem.
 
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Old 12-31-06, 12:08 PM
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Painting Hot Wall

The problem only arises when fire is lit. If painted in Summer no problem until winter fires are lit. Have asked around locally but not received much advice so far. The idea of a heat shield seems to make some sense.
 
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Old 01-03-07, 09:29 AM
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There's a variety of heat resistant paints on the market, not sure if they'll work in your situation but it's worth looking into.
 
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Old 01-04-07, 05:26 AM
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Painting Hot Wall

thanks. have got heat-resistant paint and will see whether it works. I've also replastered the wall.
 
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Old 01-11-07, 12:41 PM
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Very interesting problem. My first inclination would be to try to strip all the paint off the affected area, down to bare rock again. Wirebrush it, clean it, and start over with a new primer/finish system. And my first choice for a primer would be a masonry sealer. That is, if I read the post right, and these walls are block/rock of some sort?
 
 

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