Glazes


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Old 01-04-07, 08:22 PM
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Question Glazes

Hi:
I am getting back to a wall that was painted a too-bright mustardy yellow.
Someone told me to use a glaze to tone it down. What did they mean? Is there a special technique and what glaze should I use?
Any advice will be MOST appreciated. I am setting up the room as a quasi-english "library" - masculine, with darker wallpaper on the low half and paint on the upper half of the walls.
 
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Old 01-04-07, 10:07 PM
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A glaze is used for faux or decorative painting. Paint is mixed with a glazing medium to provide transluscent appearance and longer drying time so the glaze can be worked/applied onto the wall. To tone down yellow, a purple can be used--but it is all going to depend on your wallpaper. Unless you are interested in faux painting, it might be easier to repaint--or some people have recommended the woolie.
 
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Old 01-04-07, 11:03 PM
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I agree that it would be simpler to repaint in desired color or hue that is compatible with wallpaper and decor. What color is the wallpaper? Your furnishings? Window treatments?

If paper has brown tones to mimic the rich wood often found in formal English homes and libraries, then you will want a more compatible gold that is more tan in hue or a golden chestnut brown to give the room the richness you are trying to achieve.
 
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Old 01-05-07, 08:49 PM
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Yes - good idea

Hi - Thanks for the reply. The wallpaper for the bottom half of the room is a deep "cordovan" (if you are old enough you'll recall a shoe polish and a Crayola crayon with that name) with widely spaced gold stars. I even thought of going over the too-bright mustardy color with gold metalic paint.What do you think of that? The room is in a north facing condo and doesn't get a lot of light, so I'm a little nervous about going over the existing color with a brown tone. Plus I have this great art-deco print that's 90% black but does have a gold frame and small gold part in it that would play off the gold stars quite nicely, I think.
Your thoughts?
Thanks so much!
 
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Old 01-05-07, 09:42 PM
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You mean they don't have that cordovan crayon in the Crayola boxes any more? Guess you're no youngster either?

Actually cordovan is a fine leather that originated in Spain. The color cordovan is brown with red/purple undertones. The right gold should be outstanding with cordovan and make the stars stand out. I am afraid that gold metallic would not tone down the mustard as you would anticipate. Buy a sample jar and apply some to some to your wall paint on a piece of cardboard or scrap of wood to see what you think.

I can see that the too mustardy gold would be unsettling. I am envisioning that special gold that bespeaks luxury that swallows you up and makes you feel cozy and relaxed enough to sit back in the library with a cup of tea and a good book.

Let's go back to your stars. How does the gold in the stars compare to the mustardy walls? Would the gold in the stars be the one? Would gold frames be lost on gold walls? Maybe on the right gold.

I was not suggesting going over your gold with a brown tone. I was suggesting that you repaint with a gold that has undertones of brown that will soften the walls and be more compatible with your wall paper. The brown undertones would be compatible with the brown in cordovan and tie the paint to the paper. Such a gold would allow your frames on your art pop. When at the paint store looking at the metallic gold, pick up some more gold paint chips. Bring them home and study them in natural and artificial light. When choosing paint, you have to look beyond what you think you see to the undertones beneath.
 

Last edited by twelvepole; 01-05-07 at 09:53 PM.
 

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