Repainting a metal freestanding fireplace


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Old 01-24-07, 06:05 AM
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Repainting a metal freestanding fireplace

I've just bought a house (my first!), and in it there's a freestanding fireplace -- a 60's design in three pieces. The bottom (fire-containing) section is sort of pod-shaped, and there are two chimney sections going up and through the ceiling. It's neat looking and I want to keep it, but right now it's a really gross greenish color, and I'd like to turn it white. I looked at powder coating but understand there would be heat issues. Then I heard about high-temp paints.

Question: Is high-temp paint the way to go, and is it something an intrepid and fast-learning DIY-er could handle?

What's the process? Clean, sand, spray paint?

Thanks for whatever advice you can give me, folks.
 
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Old 01-24-07, 06:15 AM
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There are basically 2 types of high temp paints - automotive which comes in various colors and at some paint stores you can buy flat black or aluminum.
High heat paints generally are good for 1000` - 1500`. Temperatures above that usually consume the paint.

Is the stove paint single or double wall? Single wall stove pipe routinely gets hot enough to burn off high temp paints. I'd advise against white paint unless you don't plan on using the the stove.

Sand, clean and paint are the steps for painting.
 
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Old 01-24-07, 11:32 AM
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What is the current finish on the stove? Many stoves of this vintage had a baked-on enamel finish and would pose painting issues.

Keeping the original finish would add to the stove's uniqueness as a decorating element. Green can be a neutral color and a wonderful color around which to coordinate a color scheme.
 
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Old 01-24-07, 12:28 PM
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Thanks, folks, for your quick replies.

I'll look closely when I'm home but it sure seems just like paint vs enamel. How do I tell the difference? If, say, one of the chimney pieces "gives" a little when I start to bend it, would that mean it's not enamel?

Twelvepole, I understand what you say about original finishes, but this particular shade of green is something I've only ever seen in a diaper, and original or not, it's yukky with a capital "yuk."
 
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Old 01-24-07, 06:42 PM
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Originally Posted by clayrr View Post
it's yukky with a capital "yuk."
I thought it was spelled YUK!!!!

If it is paint it should sand or scratch fairly easy. The baked on enamel coating 12pole is talking about is hard and not easily sanded or scratched = harder for paint to adhere to.
 
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Old 01-25-07, 05:27 AM
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Your local Fireplace and Stove shop will have actual "stove paint" in spray cans for this purpose
(Generally it's hard to find at, or they have limited colors at, the larger big box and hardware/paint shops...HD may have black, but I can tell you it's not nearly as good as the stove shop stuff)
Clean, sand, wipe, paint

If it's a baked on enamel on there now, that could pose problems for adhesion
 
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Old 01-25-07, 05:44 AM
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Post a picture at photobucket.com or other for us to see this unusual green pod stove.
 
 

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