I need a hard wearing paint.


  #1  
Old 01-24-07, 01:10 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I need a hard wearing paint.

Hi all

I am making a computer desk out of mdf and I need a realy good hard wearing paint for the desk top.

Is there a paint out there that is nearly as good if not as good as a melamine serface? or is there a varnish I could use on the top to stop it scratching?

I also need a good paint for some kids furnature I want to make.

Thanks for any advice.

Matt.
 
  #2  
Old 01-24-07, 01:27 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Porch & Floor enamel
I'd recommend Ben Moore's off-hand, but I'm sure Sherwin Williams is just as good
I haven't found one as good from any big box stores

The Porch & Floor enamel is very, very, tough
And not just for floors
I use it in commercial applications where I need a super-tough washable surface
Like restaurant restroom walls, commercial shelving..etc...

It definitely would work for a desktop and for kid's furniture
 
  #3  
Old 01-24-07, 06:14 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,072
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
I agree with slickshift

No need for a varnish/poly top coat. Oil enamels dry the hardest although the waterborne enamels are close second.
 
  #4  
Old 01-25-07, 02:05 PM
bigfred's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 417
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Many years ago I painted my kids' toy shelves with an oil based enamel. Years later when the kids outgrew the shelves, we gave them to a friend. Before giving them to the friend I looked at the paint and was amazed how well it had held up. From then on whenever I have a paint job that calls for a really tough paint I have used an oil based paint. I'd use a porch and enamel oil based paint.
 
  #5  
Old 01-26-07, 09:54 AM
J
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Sparta, NJ
Posts: 169
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Could porch & floor paint be used on a 1960's formica kitchen counter top provided the surface was prepped correctly ? By prepping I would sand all surfaces with a fine sand paper with an orbital sander, then clean and degrease the surface.
 
  #6  
Old 01-26-07, 02:59 PM
bigfred's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 417
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I have never painted over formica before. Plus I wouldn't want a painted countertop because I don't think it would hold up over time. On the other hand, the paint might stick okay. You could try it on an inconspicious part of the counter top to find out if you're satisfied. If you decide to go with this approach, you should be sure to put some of the paint in a small jar for the inevitable touch-up you'll be doing.

Another approach would be to buy some 1/8th inch plywood at Lowe's or Home Depot and nail it over the formica. Better yet, buy some new formica and glue it over the existing formica (I haven't tried this either, so I'd test first to make sure it will stick adequately).

Just my 2 cents worth...
 
  #7  
Old 01-26-07, 04:35 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,072
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
I wouldn't paint a kitchen counter top for 2 reasons - it is hard to get paint to stick [needs aggressive sanding just to have a chance] and I'd hate for any paint to chip up and find it's way into any food
 
  #8  
Old 01-26-07, 05:48 PM
J
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Sparta, NJ
Posts: 169
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
What, your not supposed to eat paint ? Just kidding. I was thinking of painting the counter tops as a temporary solution until I can redo the kitchen. But if the paint chips it will probably look worse then the original counter top design so i think I will leave it alone.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: