USG first coat primer over textured walls?


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Old 01-28-07, 06:00 PM
J
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USG first coat primer over textured walls?

Couple questions here. I bought a couple gallons of usg first coat primer last week, and this weekend I had a guy texture the new rocked walls orangepeel. I was not planning on having any texture sprayed on and was going to use the first coat, as it is supposed to minimize any surface flaws. My question, can I still use the first coat primer on the newly textured walls without drastically affecting the look of the orangepeel, or doesn't it make that much of a difference? I can easily return the USG product for some other type of primer, if you folks know of a better primer for fresh drywall?

Also, one of the walls was previously painted, can the "first coat" be applied to this? The instructions really don't go into detail on that.
Not sure if this is the correct forum, but I'm sure someone will guide me in the right direction if its not!
Thanks for the help.
Jason
 
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Old 01-28-07, 06:15 PM
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I'm not familiar with that particular product, but if it say it's for new drywall on the can, it should be fine
 
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Old 01-29-07, 02:56 AM
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Hello Jason,
USG First Coat - according to their literature - is formulated to minimize the surface differences between drywall and the tape joints. They also go on to say that it helps hide minor surface imperfections.

http://www.usg.com/navigate.do?resource=/USG_Marketing_Content/usg.com/web_files/products/prod_details/Sheetrock_Brand_First_Coat_Primer.htm

Based on that, it would probably be better to return it and pick up something a little thinner that wouldn't hide the texture as much.

PVA - polyvinyl acetate - based wall primers are generally less bodied than an acrylic based one, so I'd look in that direction. I'd also reduce it - possibly as much as 25%. If you do that, makse sure you cover everything you don't want painted. Reduced by that amount, it will generate a lot of splatter.
 
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Old 01-29-07, 03:41 AM
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USG first coat and similiar hi build primers are best applied by spray and are intended for slick finish walls/ceilings. While it can be rolled and/or thinned down it isn't the best primer for texture. I'd return it and get a primer that is better suited for the top coat.

A newly textured painted wall should be treated [primed] as new drywall.
 
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Old 01-29-07, 05:41 AM
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Hmmm... I defer to the people more familiar with the product and suggest following their advice

Rich and/or Mark
This primer mentioned can really fill in low spots in textured surfaces?
"High Build"?
Is it intended for bad drywall jobs?

Or more for getting a level 4 drywall job to look like a level 5?
 
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Old 01-29-07, 06:48 AM
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While some try to use hi build primers to fix bad finishing it is mainly for filling/hiding minor imperfections.

side note - it's most effective sprayed but small pumps may not handle it. When I started using SWP's equivalent in my titan 660's I noticed increased packing and piston wear. While packing wear is expected I never had to replace pistons before regularly spraying hi build.
 
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Old 01-29-07, 04:45 PM
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Thanks for the replies!
Now it seems like I might have yet another issue. The local "expert" at the home improvement center thought the paint job wouldn't last very long as the bare drywall was not primed PRIOR to texturing? To me this doesn't make any sense as the texture was water thinnned compound, any thoughts on this? I'm hoping to prime over the texture, I can't see any problem with this?!
Rich, you also mentioned reducing the primer to 25%, does that mean essentially 25% primer and 75% water or the opposite? I did return the USG and picked up some PVA this afternoon.
thanks!
 
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Old 01-30-07, 03:18 AM
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Hello Jason,
25% water - but only if needed to preserve the slight texture finish.

"The local "expert" at the home improvement center thought the paint job wouldn't last very long as the bare drywall was not primed PRIOR to texturing?"

It's possible that's true, but kind of doubtful. The bare paper face of the bare drywall could possibly absorb too much liquid from the texture material - but again - I really doubt it.
 
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Old 01-30-07, 04:11 AM
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While there might be a rare occasion that raw drywall needs priming prior to texture, texture always benifits from primer.

It is hard to find good painting advice at a big box - which is one of reasons why I always recomend going to a paint store.
 
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Old 01-30-07, 12:25 PM
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Hey, thanks for the advice. I can't see how its any different than compound on bare drywall, but the guy scared me a bit. Either way its too late to change it now, I'll just go with it and see what happens.
It's tough to give much credence to big box salespeople, but since the texture guy didn't mention anything about it, I'm not too worried.

Thats why I come here for advice, as you've all done it many more times than I have!
Thanks again, J
 
  #11  
Old 01-30-07, 12:55 PM
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Jason: Here is the real story with First Coat. All sheetrock made since 1995 has been made with recycled paper. Recycled paper is very dry. When new sheetrock is put up, most people do not know that you need to prime it. If you paint over new sheetrock, the paper will suck the moisture out of the paint, and in about a year, you paint will literally fall off your walls. Thats why they call it first coat. Its the first coat you put on the sheetrock. Now you can tape and mud without priming first. However, you should put on a coat of this primer before texturing. Forget about the imprefection stuff. The imperfections they are talking about, you probably would not notice anyway. The type your thinking of should be mudded. Now, you can put first cote on top of your texture. Not a problem. It looks fine, works fine, and absolutely will not fill in your orange peel. It will be nice and white. Very white. You DO NOT thin first cote. Just stir it up, usually with a electric paint paddle or have it shaken at the store. You do not put in on thick like paint. Just use a roller, and a small paint brush around the edges. You only need to cover the paper. The recylced paper will suck the moisture out of the first cote instead of your paint. I have customers who never even paint their walls after I am done applying first cote. The walls are nice and white and that stay that way. Now you have the whole story. By the way, there is no reason your texture guy would mention it. Not his job. Hope this helps.
 
 

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