Paintstore made my paint semigloss, not eggshell


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Old 01-28-07, 06:04 PM
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Paintstore made my paint semigloss, not eggshell

I have three gallons of latex paint I had mixed 14 months ago and never used. Only now do I look and see that they mixed it as semi gloss.

Is there any treatment that I can use to reduce the sheen to satin or even flat?
 
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Old 01-28-07, 06:08 PM
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Sorry, but no
 
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Old 01-28-07, 06:28 PM
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digging a little deeper

What if I was to buy flat paint of the same color and mix it with the semigloss, would that average out to satin or eggshell?
 
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Old 01-29-07, 02:43 AM
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Hello,
Yes. Mixing flat with semi-gloss would cut the sheen.
It's not cost effective though since it's usually a 1:1 ratio.
Also, the color will be slightly off;you need to insure that you mix it completely so as not to end up with spots with more or less sheen than others.

I suggest cutting your losses and simply buy eggshell. Since most jobs need two coats, you can always use the semi gloss as the first coat, scuff sand it, and use the eggshell as the top coat.

P.S. - Interior semi gloss (lighter shades) makes a great exterior utility grade finish. It will "chalk" as it weathers. that makes it bad for trim, since the "chalk" will run down on the other surfaces. For fences however, the "chalking" makes it "self cleaning".
Or you might be able to use it up in the garage.
 
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Old 01-29-07, 03:51 AM
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I've inter mixed sheens with a lot of success [especially on my own home utilizing left over paints ] 1-2 gals of flat should recuce the sheen to your liking. IT MUST BE MIXED THROUGHLY and you may never duplicate the sheen.

While I've worked for a company in fla that often used interior latex for stucco primer and occasionally masonary top coat I wouldn't recomend it. In the south it will mildew quicker besides not last as long and in colder climates I'd worry about continued adhesion.
 
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Old 01-30-07, 04:10 AM
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Hello Mark,

A "dirty little industry secret" here.

Medium quality latex finishes are (or at least were at one point) true interior/exterior products. Back when I worked for a major mfg, I had access to the master price list of all of their products.
In addition to the costs/prices, it listed all of the products by their "base product".
Many of the exterior products were relabels of interior products.

The now defunct Hill's department stores' exterior latex flat house paint, was simply a relabel of Glidden's Spred Satin interior flat wall paint. (# 3470 Ceiling Flat White).

LOL! I remember one time we tried to order 396 gallons of Hill's label goods (4 full skids), and 396 Spred Satin labels, since the transfer cost of the Hill's was like $.50 a gallon cheaper - even figuring in the cost of the labels.
~ an hour after the store manager, Jim, called in the order, he got a call form the district manager....
I believe the conversation was something like "Jim, hide that damned master price list from Rich".

- Edited to add.
This was 35/40 years ago. I'm not sure if goods are repackaged under different labels anymore or not. Since heavy metals (mainly mercury) have been removed from most materials, I kind of doubt that it's done anymore.
Best advice - as always - follow what the mfg. prints on the label as to where & how to use their product.
 

Last edited by Rich E; 01-30-07 at 04:33 AM.
 

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