Painting over Old Vinyl Floor

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  #1  
Old 02-13-07, 04:38 PM
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Painting over Old Vinyl Floor

I have a small guest bathroom, with 20 year old vinyl which is glued to concrete. I was thinking of painting it. It has a bit of textured finish small dimples plus cross hatching to resemble tile. I was thinking clean with TSP, light sand, high adhesive primer, then what kind of paint? Regular latex and cover with Varathane? or Plastic paint? or an oil based floor paint?
Appreciate any advise.
 
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Old 02-14-07, 04:30 AM
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Professional recomendation: NO

Amature recomendation: NO

Will paint work or last? NO

Reason: Vinyl is soft (think if you walk on it with heels, it "dimples" and then rebounds). Paint is much harder, and doesn't dimple as such. Certainly your adhesion primers are not flexible, nor ANY are rated for floors. So, your floor flexes, your paint doesn't, and within a few weeks, you will have massive failure.

For all the work you are looking to have to do, why not re-vinyl over the old? You need some vinyl floor resurfacer to fill the old vinyl texture. Its pretty easy, like skimcoating a wall. Then trowl on vinyl glue, and roll on your new floor.

Prep is scrubbing floor clean with mr clean, simple green, or other watercleaner.

Prep time is about 10 min to wash.

30 min to resurface, few hours to dry.

30 min to reglue after resurfacer dries, and another 15 min to roll out the new vinyl.

This will last forever. (or until you want to change)
 
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Old 02-14-07, 06:22 AM
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I agree!!!!

Paint will only look good until the floor recieves traffic. I doubt it would cost much more to install new vinyl over the old - if you diy.

Check with some of the flooring outlets - you can probably get a deal on leftover vinyl from a bigger job.
 
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Old 02-14-07, 03:39 PM
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Nix the paint idea. Either use the floor resurfacer gb mentions or put down 1/4 luaun plywood (set the nails and cover all nail holes and seams with putty and sand smooth).
 
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Old 02-14-07, 04:08 PM
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Plywood is good, hadn't thought of that. However, resurfacer will not make the floor higher, as it only fills in the low spots in the vinyl design.

If you use plywood, make sure it won't interfere with door closings, or how the floor meets up with the tile/carpet/laminate in the rest of the house.
Your new floor would be 1/4" wood, 1/16" glue, and the 1/8" new vinyl. Almost 1/2" higher to consider.
 
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Old 02-15-07, 11:16 AM
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I agree on the not painting
You don't want to go there
It'll go bad real quick
 
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Old 03-04-07, 10:07 AM
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Thumbs up Thank Goodness for D.I.Y. !!

So glad I found this topic as I was about to do the same thing to a huge kitchen with 20 year old dated vinyl floor! Will just overlay with new 12 inch stick on tile instead.
Thanks a lot.
 
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Old 03-04-07, 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by jahad2 View Post
So glad I found this topic as I was about to do the same thing to a huge kitchen with 20 year old dated vinyl floor! Will just overlay with new 12 inch stick on tile instead.
Thanks a lot.
Make sure you RESURFACE!!!!!

If you don't by using a resourfacer, or plywood laminate, your new tile will "telegraph" the old surface over time. So if say you had an old "tile" pattern, and your new is totally different, the new tile will "sink" into the low spots of the old tile over time and you will see it. Especially if the new tiles have a gloss.

Save yourself the trouble and resurface. Its easy, doesn't take a lot of time, and the results will be much better. Good Luck!
 
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Old 03-04-07, 12:39 PM
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Thumbs up Thanks again!

ok, will do!. resurface? what would you suggest I can use? the old floor is one piece sheet vinyl, with patters but smooth surfaced but there is a pattern. what is plywood "laminate"?
 

Last edited by jahad2; 03-04-07 at 12:41 PM. Reason: forgot something
  #10  
Old 03-04-07, 12:54 PM
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Laminate is an overlay. Often 1/4" luan or osb will be applied over the floor and then the tile/vinyl over it. I'm not well versed on 'resurfacer' but basically it is a compound that you spread over the old surface to level it out.
 
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Old 03-05-07, 06:18 AM
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Just go to a home store, or flooring supply store and ask for a gallon on resurfacer, and a smooth trowel. Its thick stuff, and you basically trowel it across the floor (smooth), as you are only filling in the low spots (indentations).

Remember to work from a corner to an exit(duhh) so you don't box yourself in.

It should take no more than 30-45 minutes of work to finish your floor. You need to hustle as it sets up fairly quickly, and has a solvent odor, so open a window or 2.

After the floor is more or less smooth, let it dry (per can specs) and then do your new tiles over it.

Again, its only to fill in the low spots, not the "whole" floor. You don't need the floor to look like one solid patch of resurfacer, as it is for the "patterns" on the vinyl. If anything,it will look like reverse of your current floor.

Good luck!

PS, if you are still unsure, use a tile or 2 from your new stuff to practice on. (or start in a closet/pantry) to get a feel for how it works.

I like the resurfacer better than plywood as it doesn't raise your floor up as much.
 
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Old 03-05-07, 06:44 AM
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Smile I like the resurfacer better than plywood as it doesn't raise your floor up as much.

Thanks to you both.
I suspect the luan is more expensive than the resurfacer too. I can see a few places in the current floor that have gouges or damage like "punctures" in it, but I cannot really any low spots. Should I just concentrate on those obviously damaged areas? I can't see how the pattern that is in the sheet vinyl could ever show thru the new vinyl tiles, but I want to do this the right way. Is "thin set" the same thing as a resurfacer? Did I mention that this is a very large kitchen floor in a mobile home? Not sure if that makes a difference or not.

I have another question, off topic.
Do ya'll know anything about making your own wood tile squares out of 1/4 inch plywood? like "parquet" but made from plywood?
J.D.
 
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Old 03-05-07, 10:06 AM
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Do the WHOLE floor. It will fill in all the dimples, patterns, gouges (if they are raised up, like a chair dug into the floor or something, cut that part out so it is not sticking up, or your new floor will look like you put it over a rock!

Its not just for damage, it is to make the new floor not "telegraph" the old pattern as it settles. Again, its just to fill in the low spots of your floor (ie the design, fake grout joints, dimmples, seams etc).

I know nothing about making a parkay out of plywood. By the time your done with labor and wood, it may be cheaper to buy a parkay floor outright. But, then again, I have no idea how you would do it.
 
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Old 03-05-07, 11:11 AM
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Thumbs up Okay, Thanks again for the advice.

Thanks!
J.D.
 
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