Painted drywall patching materials


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Old 02-14-07, 03:47 PM
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Painted drywall patching materials

Right or wrong, I have used spackling for most painted drywall repairs prior to re-painting. I just noticed on a new DAP container that it states "do not use for skim coating". What does that mean and why?

1. Does this mean you shouldn't use it to repair a 3 inch area of flaked off paint that feather edging doesn't quite work? Or a 1/16 inch deep dent the size of a quarter?

2. Could you guys do a general summary of painted drywall repair for dents, holes (under 1/2 inch), and cracks (hairline and bigger). Not ones that require structural repairs or backing material.

Would caulk or something maybe postpone the re-appearance of hairline cracks (I realize that cracks are often the result of movement, maybe bad construction)?

3. Materials: Spackling, "light" spackling, putty, caulk, joint compound,elastomeric compounds, others? Any "pro" tips regarding "better" products and methods?


I have gotten along o.k. for many years. I'm just looking to take it to the next level and tap in to some professional wisdom.

Thanks!
 

Last edited by slowbutsure; 02-14-07 at 03:56 PM. Reason: grammer
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Old 02-14-07, 03:59 PM
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Spackling is only for minor repairs. It isn't formulated for large repairs. I seldom use any spackling so I don't know how far you can stretch the usuage.

Skim coating is applying a thin coat of joint compound over a large area.
Any hole that you can stick your finger in should be taped and mudded.
Caulking isn't really a material suited for drywall repair but there are times that it can be usefull on inside corners.
 
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Old 02-15-07, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by slowbutsure View Post
I just noticed on a new DAP container that it states "do not use for skim coating". What does that mean and why?
Skim coating is a thin layer of joint compound over the drywall to smooth out imperfections
Lightweight repair "spackle" would not be good for this application
It's unlikely you could roll/brush over such large areas
Though with a light touch you might be able to "get away with it"
I'd be concerned about durability of the repair
Originally Posted by slowbutsure View Post
1. Does this mean you shouldn't use it to repair a 3 inch area of flaked off paint that feather edging doesn't quite work? Or a 1/16 inch deep dent the size of a quarter?
Yes
J/C would be the preferred method in those cases

Originally Posted by slowbutsure View Post
2. Could you guys do a general summary of painted drywall repair for dents, holes (under 1/2 inch), and cracks (hairline and bigger). Not ones that require structural repairs or backing material.
I'm not sure what you mean
Spackle for the little stuff, J/C for the bigger stuff
marksr's finger guide is pretty accurate

Originally Posted by slowbutsure View Post
Would caulk or something maybe postpone the re-appearance of hairline cracks (I realize that cracks are often the result of movement, maybe bad construction)?
It's possible
Settling cracks would be beyond your control
I will sometime repair them with caulk or latex "GoodBye Cracks" spray
But my contract still has a waiver about them (not covered under warranty-sorry folks that's beyond my control)
As a general rule, it works pretty well though

Originally Posted by slowbutsure View Post
3. Materials: Spackling, "light" spackling, putty, caulk, joint compound,elastomeric compounds, others? Any "pro" tips regarding "better" products and methods?
Nope, not really
Lightweight latex spackle for little, lightweight J/C for bigger
Don't skimp on product, the cheap stuff repairs cheaply
Use good quality 35 year + caulk

Originally Posted by slowbutsure View Post

I have gotten along o.k. for many years. I'm just looking to take it to the next level and tap in to some professional wisdom.
Well good luck
Any Q's, don't hesitate to ask
 
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Old 02-15-07, 05:37 PM
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Thank you! Now I'm getting somewhere (probably deeper in trouble).

Spackling is for "small" repairs - nail holes, dents, etc.

Joint compound for larger repairs - large holes, skim coating, etc.

I imagine the USG products I saw in four pound boxes would suit a DIY'er:
Sheetrock 5 and 90 (setting times) labeled as lightweight joint compound for patching and taping.......

1. Does shorter setting time affect strength, adhesion, flexibility, etc.? Regular J/C have a 24 hour dry time.

2. Can joint compounds be applied over roughed up (sanded) PAINTED surfaces (vs. bare drywall)?

3. Spackling and J/C seem similar. How are they different and why can't spackling be used as a J/C?

Finally, years ago I used a product called KrackKote that consisted of fiberglass screen and a flexible compound to apply over it. It worked great to stop re-curring cracks but was very difficult to tool/impossible to sand. I haven't seen it around any more.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 02-15-07, 07:29 PM
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Originally Posted by slowbutsure View Post
I imagine the USG products I saw in four pound boxes would suit a DIY'er:
Sheetrock 5 and 90 (setting times) labeled as lightweight joint compound for patching and taping.......
Whoa...Hot Mud!

...it does literally get hot
And hardens up real quick
Be careful, and only mix what you can use quickly

Originally Posted by slowbutsure View Post
1. Does shorter setting time affect strength, adhesion, flexibility, etc.? Regular J/C have a 24 hour dry time.
Not really
Though some prefer to use a slow drying J/C for the last coat, it's more a smooth/sand issue which is negligible, but arguable that it is there
The convenience of not having to wait 24 hours for a small patch to dry does have it's benefits...especially for a professional...especially for a small patch job

Originally Posted by slowbutsure View Post
2. Can joint compounds be applied over roughed up (sanded) PAINTED surfaces (vs. bare drywall)?
Yup
No problem

Originally Posted by slowbutsure View Post
3. Spackling and J/C seem similar. How are they different and why can't spackling be used as a J/C?
Hmmm.. they are really not the same
I can't tell you the chemical reasons
Take a paint stick and mix up a tub of each
They are pretty different

Try and tape some drywall with latex "spackle"
It's just not going to happen

Originally Posted by slowbutsure View Post
Finally, years ago I used a product called KrackKote that consisted of fiberglass screen and a flexible compound to apply over it. It worked great to stop re-curring cracks but was very difficult to tool/impossible to sand. I haven't seen it around any more.
I haven't seen a fiberglass repair kit meant for drywall
But then, I haven't been looking
Lol

I have used GoodBye Cracks latex spray
It's also hard to find
If I find it in a good old fashioned hardware store, I'll usually empty the shelf
It could be years before I see it again

I'll keep an eye out for KrackKote
Though I've used fiberglass on boats and cars, I've never used it on walls
It must be hard to sand
Some of my contemporaries love using Bondo as wood filler on exterior trim
Who knew? < shrugs >
 
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Old 02-16-07, 07:27 AM
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Originally Posted by slowbutsure View Post
Finally, years ago I used a product called KrackKote that consisted of fiberglass screen and a flexible compound to apply over it.
Was the fiberglass screen similiar to the self adhesive 'sticky' tape? While paper tape is superior to sticky tape any tape will help to prevent a crack from reoccuring. The only flexable compounds that I'm familiar with are caulkings - tubes & bulk - I can't imagine doing drywall work with them.
 
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Old 02-16-07, 03:06 PM
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If you google Krack-kote, you will find some discussions on it - even one at the contractor's forum.

The Krack-kote fiberglass mesh has openings about the size of window screen, much smaller than drywall tape.

Another company (Synkoloid) had/has a similar product called Tuff-Patch.

With both products, the flexible compound applied over the tape is impossible to sand, so you have to skim coat over it with a traditional product and sand.

The reason for so much effort? Supposedly a permanent crack repair.
 
 

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