Latex Cure Time?


  #1  
Old 02-19-07, 03:20 PM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 90
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Latex Cure Time?

How long should latex Benjamin Moore cure on bathroom walls before running showers? I used 2 coats of Zinzer latex primer under the Benjamin Moore and let that cure for a week, then applied 2 coats of the B. Moore yesterday and today.

When this bathroom was totally re-done last spring, there was some brown leaching from the original new paint(Glidden Exterior Latex) that was used about a month after painting. One B. Moore store said minimum of 28 days for latex to cure fully. Is that correct? I'm guessing using the outdoor indoors was the culprit.

Thanks in advance.

AW
 
  #2  
Old 02-19-07, 04:17 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,082
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Since interior paint is forumulated for inside and exterior for outside it is best to follow the label.

While it takes longer to fully cure, if the paint has had 24-36 hrs of low humidty warm temp drying time it should be ok for anything other than a suana type shower.

Was the brown leaching from the paint color or something that wasn't sealed under the paint?
 
  #3  
Old 02-19-07, 05:02 PM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 90
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the info.

The guy at the Benjamin Moore store by my work said it was SURFACTANT LEACHING caused by us not letting the original paint to cure long enough before using the shower. The brown discharge that came thru is caused by thickener in latex being extracted by high humidity situations like a bathroom with shower. Then he went on to tell me latex paint needs 28 full days to cure(which I still doubt). He was also selling gallons of Benjamin Moore for 42 + tax, so I went to elsewhere and got the same gallon for 30.

I probably should have used Zinzer to prime the old painted sheetrock the 1st time when the bathroom was bring re-done. Instead I washed all the walls and ceilings down with warm water, let it dry for a week, and then painted it with the Exterior Glidden that came recomended to us. Had I used the Zinzer primer and interior latex then, I probably wouldn't have had this problem at all.

To be safe we'll hold off for at least a week before using that shower.

Thanks again. AW
 
  #4  
Old 02-19-07, 05:19 PM
G
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 296
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
First, why in the world did you use Glidden EXTERIOR inside?

Yes, surfactant leaching is the culprit in that case. Not to beat a dead horse, but Ext. Paint is for OUTSIDE. All sorts of nasties in exterior paint that should not outgass indoors. As a bonus, exterior paint is LESS durable than interior paint for scrubs, and cleanablilty.

As far as 28 day CURE time, your paint store people were correct. Dry time, and CURE time are totally different. Why would you doubt the paint man? What would he gain by telling you that it is 28 days versus say 7, or 14?
And what does the cost of the paint have to do with cure time?

If you went elsewhere for a lower price, thats ok, but it won't solve your cure time issue.

Incedently it is not necessary for paint to be fully cured before use, but it is best to use caution in the first month. Especially if your using a deep color. Just avoid long hot showers without running an exhaust fan.

BTW your brown stains may haunt you for some time. As stated above, exterior paint outgasses lots of stuff, much of it for several weeks or more. When its OUTSIDE, it really doesn't matter. Inside though, and you will have a mess. Dont be suprised if you start to suffer blistering, peeling, or other coating related failures. And it won't be the fault of the new paint either, just the exterior outgassing.
 
  #5  
Old 02-21-07, 07:03 AM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 90
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The Glidden outdoor was purchased on reccomendation when the new bathroom was being done. I'm just trying to rectify the problem as I live there...

As stated, I went to another B. Moore not b/c of the initial cure time info, but b/c he was $12 less a gallon....and was just trying to confirm the 28 days here, which I did.

I scraped, sanded and then primed all the walls with 2 coats of Zinzer prior to applying the new B. Moore, so I'm hoping our Glidden outdoor woes are gone.

To be safe, we'll hold off on showers for another few weeks and use the downstairs shower in the meantime.
 

Last edited by Augustwest; 02-21-07 at 07:22 AM.
  #6  
Old 02-21-07, 08:26 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Although technically it can take 30-60 days for that paint to cure, it is perfectly OK to wash it after one week (that's by the Ben Moore book)

That means waiting longer than one week won't make that much of a difference

Although I'd prefer my customers to wait 36 hours before showering, I realize it can often be less than 24
I rarely run into surfactant leaching with that product and for that reason

If I understand you correctly, the leaching appeared last spring, about a month after the exterior paint was covered (with a latex paint?)
It's hard to tell (now) if it was the exterior paint leaching through (likely), or surfactant leaching due to excess moisture (not likely a month later, but I suppose technically possible)

After two coats of primer, you should be well sealed
Two coats of quality BM should only need a few days to dry enough to shower
If you'd like to wait a week it couldn't hurt
 
  #7  
Old 02-21-07, 09:40 AM
A
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 90
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the info...

"If I understand you correctly, the leaching appeared last spring, about a month after the exterior paint was covered (with a latex paint?)"

Actually I just prepped, Zinzered(x2), and 2 coats of BM over the last 2 weeks to fix the leaching that's been occurring since the bathroom was finished last May with said outdoor paint. The outdoor paint originally went directly over old latex that was washed down before painting. This is my first attempt at fixing the leaching problem.

AW
 
  #8  
Old 02-21-07, 10:06 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,082
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
I've run into surfacant leaching a time or two but only on the exterior and usually when painting in marginal conditions like early spring or late fall. Never had a problem with it inside but I'm not in the habit of using exterior coatings on the inside

I agree that you shouldn't have any further problems.
 
  #9  
Old 02-21-07, 10:49 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
" I...Zinzered(x2), and 2 coats of BM over the last 2 weeks to fix the leaching that's been occurring since the bathroom was finished last May with said outdoor paint....This is my first attempt at fixing the leaching problem"

Ah, I see
Still, a few days is fine
A week couldn't hurt
More than that, won't make much difference
I'm sure you won't have a problem


I've run into interior surfactant leaching once in the last few years
It is similar to this
Not in a bathroom though, it was a bedroom
Apparently immediately after I left, and long before the paint was dry, they hooked the humidifier back up and ran it up to over 75% in there, and kept it there for over a week, then called me about the "drips" that wouldn't wash off

They only appeared on an exterior wall, and this was winter

When I got there for the service call, I told them to turn off the humidifier, set up a hygrometer (which went straight up to 75% before I even left the room), and told them to call me when it got below 50%
After I fixed it I told them to keep the humidifier off for at least a week
That seemed to work just fine
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: