Brush or Roller on Interior Trim?


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Old 03-09-07, 02:55 PM
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Angry Brush or Roller on Interior Trim?

My contractor used a roller for the interior doors and interior door/window trim painting, creating dimples and ripples as opposed to a nice smooth semi-gloss finish. It appears to me that this was an unprofessional mistake -- only brushes should be used on trim, or at least a final brush "tip" to smooth the surface. Has anyone heard of a "professional" contractor doing such a job, or experienced it firsthand? I am certain that my contractor (based on his reactions to date) will tell me that there's no rule about it, so his work was fine. And no, I will not be recommending him to others. Thank you.
 
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Old 03-09-07, 03:10 PM
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Welcome to the diy forums!

As you now are aware not all professionals are

I've seen crews that use rollers on trim and have been on jobs where a 1/4" mohair roller was acceptable on flush doors [low end housing] The times I've seen 4" rollers used on trim I took it to mean the "painters" weren't very experienced.

There are times when a roller will be used to speed up the job but after the enamel is applied, it is 'tipped out' with a brush.

Depending on what your contract with the painter stated, you may not have any recourse but if possible you should get him to sand down the woodwork and recoat with a brush.
 
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Old 03-09-07, 03:18 PM
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Well, there is no "rule" as to how trim must be painted.

I for one think that a smooth foam roller is the way to go on panel doors, as it fits into the groves very nicely. Some perfer to brush, but the temptation to overwork the product can also cause problems with brushing.

It may not be the tool as much as the product. SW (Sherwin Williams) makes an oil and a waterborne under the name of ProClassic. This product levels very nicely with either brush or roller, and SHOULDN'T leave roller stipple, or brush marks providing that you lay on the paint, and leave it alone.

The more you mess with it, the more you leave. Also, it would be advisable to use XIM Latex Extender to add more wet time, before it sets. Some of this crowd recommends Flo-Trol, but that is ancient technology. It yellows, voids the mfg warrenty, and in my opinion is as easy to work with as adding Elmers Glue to your paint. But I digress.

So in the end, it may not be your painter, but the tools, or the paint he used. Did you provide the material? If so, did you cut corners and spend a little less because you were paying someone to do the work?
Or did he buy a cheaper grade paint to meet the bid?

At this point, a good sanding, and recoating with a HIGH quality product should fix your issues. Brush OR roll.
 
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Old 03-12-07, 05:24 AM
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thanks for the responses. I did not buy the material. The previous (old) paint was oil-based and had yellowed, and I wanted it more white. I did not want a full stripping, because there is undoubtedly lead-based paint underneath the various coats. My preference was not to use oil, but I let the contractor recommend the best course. He chose Duron latex paint, and first did a coat of Bullseye primer. When I saw the "orange peel" effect, I pointed it out to the contractor's painter (the guy I contracted with never came to inspect), who thought that the roller they used may have caused the problem; incidently, it did not appear on ALL trim -- the narrower trim around windows has a smooth finish. So, they sanded and painted another coat -- and that did not remove the texture. I am going to get another quote for how much it would cost to strip it back down and repaint.
 
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Old 03-12-07, 05:33 AM
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Latex enamel doesn't sand as well as oil base but I would think [sight unseen] that it could be sanded well enough to apply another coat of enamel properly and eliminate 90% or more of the offending roller texture.
 
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Old 03-12-07, 05:47 AM
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If you are seriously concerned about LEAD, stripping and repainting will set you back a signifcant amount of money.

Lead Abatement is a serious issue, and should only be addressed by certified lead abatement contractors. They will make sure there is no cross contamination through the rest of the home.

Lead contamination can cause long term health problems and should not be ignored.

It may be best to either live with the issue as it is now, or be prepared for a hefty bill to correct.

Good luck!
 
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Old 03-12-07, 07:02 AM
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Agree; the lead issue is why I just wanted a new coat of paint. Living with it is probably my only option, but I do need to make it clear to the contractor that he did not complete the job adequately.
 
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Old 03-12-07, 04:42 PM
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I don't know if it is too late or not but the customer always has one BIG bargaining chip - the check book. If you don't pay until sastisfied, you will likely get the problem fixed.
 
 

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