Behr Primer - Any Good?


  #1  
Old 03-11-07, 07:39 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Behr Primer - Any Good?

I've just finished priming one of the rooms of my new addition (new drywall) with Behr Primer Sealer for New Drywall. I understand from reading other posts here that drywall primers don't need to create a uniformly opaque coating, they are more to seal and even out surface characteristics of the bare drywall and mud. But i am concerned with just how translucent the Behr primer is. Every mud seam and pencil mark just jumps out. Should I be concerned? Should i consider switching to another brand of drywall primer for the rest of the addition (I have a lot left to do)?

thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 03-12-07, 05:05 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
No, it's not that good
Yes, you should switch
Primer is meant to seal and help the paint adhere
That stuff does neither well

Ben Moore and Sherwin Williams have much, much, better primer/sealers for new drywall, and they will help insure against paint failures and poor looking paint jobs

For a more affordable under-rated primer/sealer for new drywall, try the Pittsburgh Speed Hide primer/sealer for new drywall
Although it's called a "contractor grade" (a nice way of calling it cheap), it is a spectacular performing primer/sealer for new drywall I use and can recommend using for even high end jobs

And not that it has to, but when properly applied using good quality brushes and roller sleeves it almost looks like the second coat rather than the primer coat

For your paint I'd also strongly suggest one of the premium lines (not "contractor") from Ben Moore, Sherwin Williams, or Pittsburgh
 
  #3  
Old 03-12-07, 05:40 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,087
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
I agree with slick. From what little Behr products I've used and the many jobs I've seen/fixed that were done with Behr it = not a proffessional looking paint job! You will be a lot happier with the result of using quality paints/primer.

It has always been my opinion that cheap paints color the wall but quality paints MAKE the wall!
 
  #4  
Old 03-12-07, 05:42 AM
G
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 296
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
In your situation, the answer is "it depends".

If you are going to use a FLAT latex, you can overcome this problem with a HIGH quality flat latex, you most likely will suffer no problems.

If you are going to use an Eg-shel/satin, or Semi-Gloss, you will have some trouble as the lower quality primers have no 'Hold-Out' and you will suffer gloss flashes, dead spots, and other problems.

So, if you are painting flat, use a very high quality, and it may take 2 coats (I recommend 2 anyway) without re-priming.

Eg-Shel or higher gloss, reprime.

Good Luck!
 
  #5  
Old 03-12-07, 06:03 AM
Pendragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 1,851
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
I painted my entire home (2400 sq ft) first with Behr primer and then with Behr semi-gloss paint. All I can say is, the other posters must not have applied it correctly, as I've seen none of the issues they report.

If you have a lot to do, I highly recommend a power roller. It will go faster and you will use far less primer/paint.

And no, it's not meant to cover the wall. If you can see where you primed, it's done it's job.
 
  #6  
Old 03-12-07, 06:56 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,087
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Pendragon

I don't want you to take this wrong, no malice intended.

Not all diyers know how much easier quality coatings apply or how much better they look on the wall. This is especially true with new construction. There is a big difference between 1 coat primer, 1 coat finish of cheap versus quality paints on previously unpainted surfaces.

Decent results can be had when repainting with lesser grade coatings but it is sooo much easier to get a good job with quality products!
 
  #7  
Old 03-12-07, 07:04 AM
G
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 296
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Pendragon View Post
I painted my entire home (2400 sq ft) first with Behr primer and then with Behr semi-gloss paint. All I can say is, the other posters must not have applied it correctly, as I've seen none of the issues they report.

If you have a lot to do, I highly recommend a power roller. It will go faster and you will use far less primer/paint.

And no, it's not meant to cover the wall. If you can see where you primed, it's done it's job.
Great! 1 Anecdotal result doesn't equate into long term success with a low grade product. If you had success we are all happy for you.

However, it is indisputable that a higher quality product will yeild more sucessful results long term than a low quality product. And Behr ain't high quality.

As far as primer designed to 'cover' a wall, your painting with a broad brush (excuse the pun). Primer should cover the wall. It may not be 100% solid white, but you shouldn't see every mud stip on the wall. If you don't have adequate coverage from the primer, it CAN affect the entire surface.

Painting with a power roller will NOT reduce the amount of paint used either. It will use LESS than if you use an airless rig, but will not save material over brush/roller combo. It may go faster, as your not dipping as much, but depending upon the rig, you may need to fill more often. Who wants to carry a gallon or more on their backs anyway? I would suggest using an airless with a roller attachment. Then you can pull out of a 5, and go for 250' from your source. But if your going to do that, just spray and backroll. With proper prep, you could have done your entire 2400' home in less than 4 hours!

Also, OP indicated it was one room. By the time you set up your painting rig, you could have finished with a traditional roller/brush. No benefit for using it in 1 room, as any time savings will be negated by needing to clean out the roller, lines and pump. Not really worth it for 1 room.

BTW why in the world would you paint your entire home in S/G? Unless your running a nursing home who needs all that shine? You must see every drywall wave, and nail head pop in the joint all the time.
 
  #8  
Old 03-12-07, 07:27 AM
Pendragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 1,851
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
>Great! 1 Anecdotal result doesn't equate into long term success with a low grade product

It's my reference, if you have another, provide it, but don't just say 'this product sucks' unless you can provide specific examples of why, how it failed and why another product is better.

BTW, this was new paint, not repainting.

> And Behr ain't high quality.

And yet it is still one of the best selling paints on the planet.

> It may not be 100% solid white

I do believe I said you aren't painting the wall with it.

>Painting with a power roller will NOT reduce the amount of paint used either.

That was not my experience.

>depending upon the rig, you may need to fill more often.
>Who wants to carry a gallon or more on their backs anyway?

I stuck the hose in a 5 gallon bucket in the center of a room and rolled away. Rooms to large for the hose to reach still only have to move the bucket only once or twice. No carrying paint on my back required.

>With proper prep, you could have done your entire 2400' home in less than 4 hours!

Still took me less than a day, and that INCLUDES prep time.

>Also, OP indicated it was one room.

And I said 'if you are painting a lot...', we have to consider that the OP isn't the only person reading this thread.

>BTW why in the world would you paint your entire home in S/G?
>Unless your running a nursing home who needs all that shine?
>You must see every drywall wave, and nail head pop in the joint all the

Because that's what we wanted and it's easy to clean.
A good framing job followed by a good drywall finisher can do wonders for never seeing waves or joints. And my boards aren't nailed to the wall, they are glued. Sucks if ever want to tear through one, but eliminates all nails and screws and adds a decent amount to structural strength over nails/screws.
 
  #9  
Old 03-12-07, 07:55 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the Help

Thank you all for the replies and info. I'mgoing to pick up some Pittsburgh Super Hide today and see if I like it better. If so I'll return the rest of the Behr (they have a statifaction garantee). Fortunately the one room that I did prime with the Behr is a dedicated home theater and the walls will get completly covered with acoustic treatments and the ceiling is going to be a midnight blue and will need another coat of a tinted primer anyway. I mainly primed this room to control dust (yes, the walls were all throughly vacuumed clean of dust before priming but there's alway some residual dust left).

BTW, I'm planning to use Pratt and Lambert for the color coats, so that IS a good quality paint.

Thanks again.
 
  #10  
Old 03-12-07, 08:51 AM
G
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 296
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
[QUOTE=Pendragon;1140968It's my reference, if you have another, provide it, but don't just say 'this product sucks' unless you can provide specific examples of why, how it failed and why another product is better.

BTW, this was new paint, not repainting.

**********************************************************
It has been my experience that many paint failures/paint problems can be attributed to either painter error or low quality paint. Again, your example is fine as an anecdotal story, but does not reflect as a whole the professional market. There is a reason that you don't see professional painters shopping (for the most part) at home stores. The labor required to make a low grade product look good is much greater than that requried by a high quality product.

BTW I, nor anyone else on this board used the term "sucks". If that is what you are getting out of the discussion, I'm sorry.

> And Behr ain't high quality.

And yet it is still one of the best selling paints on the planet.
**********************************************************

And your point is what? The Ford Taurus for a long time was the #1 selling car. I suppose you would then suggest simply on raw sales data that Mercedes, BMW, Ferrari, were inferior cars because Ford sold the most? Your logic is a non-sequiter and irrelevent to the discussion. It is low quality paint designed to be sold at a discount rate.


> It may not be 100% solid white

I do believe I said you aren't painting the wall with it.
**********************************************************

And you also said that coverage is not important. Not so. I believe your words were "Its not meant to cover the wall". Primer is supposed to fill in the wall, and seal the drywall so the topcoat achieves even coverage.

>Painting with a power roller will NOT reduce the amount of paint used either.

That was not my experience.
**********************************************************

Please explain this one to us all. How did you use "less" paint than if you were to brush and roll? And how did you quantify "less". Did you paint the room first the traditional way, AND then recoat to judge the difference? Or did you simply guess that you would have used more paint?

I won't argue that it was FASTER than regular brush/roll, but to suggest that somehow by pushing the paint through the roller, versus dipping it would save material is simply not accurate.

It would however be more efficient in material usage than airless spray, as about 30% of the material is lost via transfer, and bounceback. But in large jobs, the material cost is outweighed by the labor cost. So if you need 2 more gallon, but the crew is finished in 1/4 time your net gain is positive.

>depending upon the rig, you may need to fill more often.
>Who wants to carry a gallon or more on their backs anyway?

I stuck the hose in a 5 gallon bucket in the center of a room and rolled away. Rooms to large for the hose to reach still only have to move the bucket only once or twice. No carrying paint on my back required.
**********************************************************

Read the rest of my post, I suggested you could use that type of setup with an airless rig with a roller attachment. In that case you can go up to 250' if you wanted to.

>With proper prep, you could have done your entire 2400' home in less than 4 hours!

Still took me less than a day, and that INCLUDES prep time.
**********************************************************

Good.

>Also, OP indicated it was one room.

And I said 'if you are painting a lot...', we have to consider that the OP isn't the only person reading this thread.
**********************************************************
On this point we agree.


As far as whole house S/G painting, that is a matter of personal taste. Not mine, but glad you are enjoying it.
 
  #11  
Old 03-12-07, 10:31 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,087
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
[QUOTE=Pendragon;1140968BTW, this was new paint, not repainting.[/QUOTE]

Glad [but suprised] that you got good results on new work with Behr. Especially with a semi-gloss finish, it is usually hard to get enamel to consistently look good on new work with just 1 coat. I'm curious, were the walls slick finished? or textured? if so what type of texture?
 
  #12  
Old 03-12-07, 11:31 AM
Pendragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 1,851
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
> There is a reason that you don't see professional painters shopping (for the

So the contractor I saw leaving home depot last week with FOUR PALLETS of 5 gallon behr paint just doesn't know what he is doing.. Got it.

>And your point is what?

Low quality products don't tend to sell in high volume or last long on the market.

>It is low quality paint designed to be sold at a discount rate.

I didn't find my purchase to be cheap, but it wasn't $100 a gallon either.

>And you also said that coverage is not important. Not so.

It doesn't have to cover the wall to the point that it looks like it's already been painted, no.

>>>Painting with a power roller will NOT reduce the amount of paint used either.
>>That was not my experience.
>Please explain this one to us all.

I painted the first room using a roller and pan and used a lot of paint/primer. I painted the REST OF THE HOUSE with essentially the same amount of material it took to do the first room.

> I suggested you could use that type of setup with an airless rig with a roller attachment.

My point was that you don't need an airless sprayer.

All that, and we get to my only real law on home improvement, use whatever you want, it's your house. I personally wouldn't have laminate or engineered flooring, but I see million dollar homes with what I consider paper-faced scrap wood all over it.
 
  #13  
Old 03-12-07, 02:08 PM
G
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 296
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
As suspected your only answer is more anecdotal evidence based on personal experience. For every 4 pallet order from a warehouse store, I can show 20 pallet orders to apartment complexes, housing developments, bridge projects (try to buy that paint from Lowes). Your example is lacking, as proven by Lowes and HD's drive to entice professional painters to shop their stores.

Currently 70-80% of professional paint store business is driven by the professional painters. These folks are not repainting their own houses day after day. They have found, many times by trial and error that coatings sold at professional paint stores are better products. Many have tried to save a few dollars on paint, and only found out that they are spending double or more on labor, complaints, and repaints. Not sure where you got your "$100"/gallon price, but I suspect just more hot air.

As far as your thought that "Low quality products don't tend to sell in high volume or last long on the market." it doesn't wash. Most retail customers are not knowledgeable in coatings. Many treat it as a commodity, and for them, the low price trumps labor savings. For a retail customer DIY, it MAY be cheaper to apply 3 coats, because they are not "paying" for the extra work. But for a professional, it doesn't make any sense to double or triple your work to save $5.00/gallon.

And as for your work in your house, your example doesn't wash. If you used as much paint in 1 room brush/roll, as you did for the "REST OF THE HOUSE with essentially the same amount of material it took to do the first room." it doesn't make sense. Either you plastered it on so thick you have runs from ceiling to floor in the first room, or you streched the heck out the material for the remainder of the job. Your power roller application is identical to brush/roll application sans the dipping. Unless you have one of those magic paint rollers that quadruples coverage when the magic pixie dust mixes with the paint in the line. Then I guess I will suspend disbelief.

And no one said you can't use what you want in your own home. But please don't try to prove that warehouse paint is as effective, or cost efficient based on 1 incident of personal experience. Because there are mountains of personal experiece contra-indicating your exerience.

I think that this discussion is about over however, as we are drifting away from the OP, and the scope of the original issue.
 

Last edited by groundbeef; 03-12-07 at 02:11 PM. Reason: spelling
  #14  
Old 03-12-07, 04:34 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: United States
Posts: 2,535
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
OK boys, put down those water guns!

Pendragon - Slick, Mark, GB, and myself have put on hundreds (thousands?) of gallons of paint over the years. I think we know how to apply paint. Using your logic, none would be in business otherwise.
I tried Behr in one room in my own house. I will never use it again. Once you've used a high quality paint, you'll see what I mean. The next time I painted, I used Sherwin-Williams. The difference was night and day.

Behr does sell a lot of paint. That doesn't mean its good. It just means they have good marketing. Do you think they would sell as much paint if one was to force all the HDs and Lowes to close? They sell a lot of paint because its cheap and most diyers can't see the difference an extra $10/gallon makes.

And just because someone gets paid to paint, that doesn't make him/her a pro or knowledgable.

Lastly, many of the problems we encounter on this site are due in part to the use of cheap paint.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: