Latex peeling on interior steel door?


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Old 03-14-07, 07:20 AM
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Latex peeling on interior steel door?

I did a search on peeling, and found one thread that sounds like the problem our church is having.

16 months ago new fire wall doors were installed, and then came factory primed. Church members using interior wall latex paint painted these doors, and now your finger nail will flake off such. The problem is basically where members touch the door to open, and where their feet touch it near the bottom. It is NOT coming off in big pieces. These door are 2" thick, 42" X 84", and there are four of them, or 8 sides.

I wonder if sanding, feather edging the chips, and then applying SOLVENT based primer before the NEW top coat is applied would work? I need to add that we would then INSTALL kick plates at the bottom, and TOUCH plates where members will be pushing the doors open.

I am in the process of asking the builder what painting instructions the door manufacture recommends regarding these doors in hopes of learning more, but WELCOME this site's thoughts.

Thank You,


Dale
Indy
 
  #2  
Old 03-14-07, 09:59 AM
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Were the doors cleaned prior to painting? Often steel doors are shipped with an oily film on them which must be washed off prior to painting. The doors should be painted with an enamel [oil base, waterborne or latex] Enamel is a lot more durable than wall paint. Any sheen will work.

Did just the latex paint peel? or was it down to raw metal? A solvent based primer may not be needed [especially if factory primer is intact] A good sanding will probably remove any non bonded paint and also may also smooth out the transision from paint to primer.
 
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Old 03-14-07, 10:03 AM
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Well, peeling is a bit different than "removal by picking at it". Does it resist the picking, and only then peel in the area directly affected by your nail, or does it sort of 'branch out' and peel more?

Sounds like there are 2 issues at play.

1. Adhesion MAY be an issue. Hard to tell until you reply to above question.

2. Paint used MAY not be the best product available. Was it a waterborne "enamel" such as SW ProClassic, or was it a donation of just satin/sg wall paint? If so, it may just be the product used is not high enough quality.

If #1 is the issue, get peelin' on the doors that are affected. If its gonna come off now, its gonna come off when repainted, except now you will have multiple layers failing.

If #2 is the issue, NOT adhesion, then I would 1)Wash the Door with waterbase cleaner. 2)Prime with either SW PrepRite Bonding Primer, or XIM UMA Waterborne Primer. 3) Paint with HIGH quaility Interior Waterborne Finish such as SW ProClassic Waterborne, or BM Satin Impervo (help me out guys, Im more of a SW fan)

As always, as in Church, rely on faith...as in DONT pick the primer off, trying to 'make sure its sticking!'. Both will work well, but maximum adhesion takes a couple of weeks. You can coat them in a few hours though.

Good Luck

BTW, do you have the original door instructions? I just finished typing above info and had a Duhhhhh moment. Double check what the instructions call for topcoating with! Sometimes MFG's instruct latex topcoat, sometimes Oil topcoat. IF your door MFG wanted oil topcoat, that may be your issue as well.

In that case, remove as much as you can, reprime with XIM Solvent, or BIN Shellac, and then topcoat with the latex. Will be fine over those primers, and make touchups easier in the future!
 

Last edited by groundbeef; 03-14-07 at 10:06 AM. Reason: additional info
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Old 03-14-07, 05:46 PM
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This is good info you both have provided. The paint that has come off is JUST THE TOP COAT, the primer is still intact.

When you pick at it what happens is small bits fail, about the size of a pencil eraser or even smaller.

I am trying to determine exactly what paint was used, how the surface was prepared, and what the door factory recommends when painting their new doors.

In the mean time we will do some sanding and see what happens.

I will keep you posted, and REALLY DO THANK YOU for the help.


Dale
Indy
 
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Old 03-14-07, 07:41 PM
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Dale,
If you don't mind, I noticed two things of concern to me.
I can't review your comment right now but I believe you said it is a Metal door...
and I believe you also said it was painted with an interior grade latex.

Groundbeef and marksr are right that the door should be thoroughly cleaned before painting. Regular interior latex paint is not as flexible as exterior grades. On top of that, to put it on a metal door (as well as metal conducts cold) seems to be a major problematic combination. Do as suggested, reread the manufacturer's instructions but it may be necessary to remove the coating of paint you put on. Check with your local paint company (a real company, not a discount store or general hardware supply!!), they'll probably have a look at the door and advise what products to use and how to use them. On heavy wear areas like doors, don't skimp on costs. The reason generally, it costs more is because it protects better!!

I just had a look at your explanation of the type of doors. METAL...ok!!!
 

Last edited by clockdaddy; 03-14-07 at 07:46 PM. Reason: correction!
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Old 03-14-07, 09:49 PM
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I need to make certain that you know that these doors are within the structure, and NOT doors to the outside, so weather is NOT a factor. They lead from a large meeting room to a large hall. They are also part of the fire wall.

Thanks,


Dale
 
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Old 03-15-07, 04:00 AM
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Hello,

"reprime with XIM Solvent"

Might want to be a bit careful with XIM 400 or 400W where the previous coats aren't known.
XIM can lift some old finishes.

XIM is one of the best primers on the market for bare surfaces.
(Has been for what,,40 years? IIRC, it's still the same orginal Glidden y-55 Surface Bond formula)

A test patch would tell if it would lift the old finish,,but XIM is pretty costly and if it does lift the old finish, there goes a pretty good chunk of $$.

" or BM Satin Impervo (help me out guys, Im more of a SW fan)"

Nope - no need for a helping hand- you're spot on with the Impervo.
Good stuff.
I'll second the recommendation of Impervo.
 
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Old 03-15-07, 07:07 AM
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Rich E,

XIM Solvent is only if door MFG recommends Solvent Topcoat. This would be after removing intial paint.

Before that I recommend UMA, or PrepRite Bonding both are waterborne.

But you should watch out for lifting, regardless of solvent topcoat.
 
 

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