Latex Eggshell Interior Paint leaving "dry" spots?

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Old 03-18-07, 02:47 PM
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Unhappy Latex Eggshell Interior Paint leaving "dry" spots?

I've painted a bedroom with a latex eggshell paint and have now added three coats. I applied the first two coats lightly - as I have done with other paint jobs - and was quite surprised when the second coat dried. I had "dry" spots on the wall, which look like small areas where the paint is noticably darker than the rest of the wall. Most of them are quite small, but there are a few that are a few feet in length and are definitely noticable. To see these areas most clearly, you have to look at the wall from an angle and not dead on.

I went back and applied a third coat and this time was very liberal with the paint and applied a thicker coat, which seemed to take care of most of darker spots; however, there are a few left that are bugging me. Surely this wall won't take four coats of paint to finish the job. Do you guys have any suggestions for what could be causing this? Should I have went with a flat paint and not eggshell?

I've rolled the paint on each time and ensured there was always a wet edge that I was rolling back into. The said spots appear in various places - middle of the wall, down by the base board, toward the ceiling, etc. The paint was mixed for a good 10-15 minutes by hand before painting and remixed several times while I was painting.

I'm out of ideas.
 
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Old 03-18-07, 06:57 PM
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Depends on the paint
I'm assuming this is a "re-paint", not a new construction (new drywall)
Could depend on the condition of the wall before painting

Assuming all the prep was done properly, and the paint was applied with quality tools, I know some paints that could still take three or four coats easy, especially in eggshell and with a "thirsty" wall
They would "flash", or show spots of sheen change, especially if thin coats are used

What paint was used?
 
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Old 03-18-07, 07:16 PM
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Originally Posted by slickshift View Post
Depends on the paint
I'm assuming this is a "re-paint", not a new construction (new drywall)
Could depend on the condition of the wall before painting

Assuming all the prep was done properly, and the paint was applied with quality tools, I know some paints that could still take three or four coats easy, especially in eggshell and with a "thirsty" wall
They would "flash", or show spots of sheen change, especially if thin coats are used

What paint was used?
It was a Valspar paint I picked up from Lowe's. I've painted a few rooms with the same paint before and never had this result - always came out clean and looking professional.

This is a re-paint; I apologize, I forgot to mention that. The walls were last painted about ~10 years ago, when it was new construction, and were painted with a standard white. I did not prime the walls (like I probably should have), but did use higher grade tools (for a DIYer, not professional by any means.)

I made sure the entire surface was smooth and sanded some of the rougher until they matched the rest of the wall. Then cut in the top, bottom, and sides as I went along (to ensure they didn't dry). Rolled in the W pattern for all coats starting in the middle, rewet the roller and rolled the top, rewet and rolled the bottom, with one light roll in between each section as I went to blend the two together.

This is how I've done it in the past and it's worked. If there's a more efficient way, I'm all ears! I'm mainly concerned with whether I should go back with ANOTHER coat of eggshell or if I should go buy a flat or semi-gloss and go over it with that?
 
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Old 03-18-07, 07:32 PM
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If it went over ten year old "builder's paint", the walls were pretty thirsty
The AmTrad (or other Lowes paint) can't keep up with it, and you are probably seeing "flashing"

You were lucky in the other rooms
It's not a terrible paint, but it can't be pushed the way some other better quality ones can be pushed...it doesn't deal as well in problem areas...and sheen changes...

Switching to another sheen now, even with a better quality paint, will require two (more) coats

Another coat of AmTrad should (s h o u l d ) fix the problem
It is possible it would take two more

So I guess it depends on how much AmTrad you have left?
No matter what, it needs at min. one coat of whatever
If you've got enough AmTrad, it might be worth a shot

If not, then for sure get a Paint Store to match the color and get some premium paint from Ben Moore, Sherwin Williams, or Pittsburgh

If the Paint Store can match the sheen and color well, and you are careful in applying it (concentrating on coverage, and using quality brushes and rollers), it should only need one coat of premium paint
 
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Old 03-18-07, 09:44 PM
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I have very, very little of the Valspar left (certainly not enough to go one more coat.) I'll definitely follow your suggestion and take it down to a local paint store and see if they can match the color/sheen and have one more go at it. This has definitely been the stubborn room!

Thanks for all your help! I'll let you know how it turns out.
 
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Old 03-19-07, 02:57 AM
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Hello,

I have a few questions:

- Are these outside walls? Not outside outside, but are the spots on walls that the other side is an outside wall?
- Do the spots follow any sort of pattern such as the outline of wall studs and/or nails in the drywall?
- What's the weather been like where you're at? Cold and sunny?
- This one may be difficult - Is there a vapor barrier behind the wallboard?
- If you run your hand across the wall can you feel any temperature difference in different places on the wall?

I've seen this happend quite a bit before where there's a sheen difference due to differing temperatures as the coating dries. It mainly occurs during cooler months on exterior siding, but it can also occur inside as well. Wood studs and nailheads and drywall all heat at different rates and transfer heat differently. This can affect the way the paint film dries.
 
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Old 03-19-07, 03:15 AM
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Another thing to consider, is the texture consistent over the entire wall. Coud this be a repair? since it is best viewed from an angle

I second the recomendation to use better paint!
 
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