Oil-Based Brush Marks (Uggghh)

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Old 04-07-07, 12:11 PM
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Red face Oil-Based Brush Marks (Uggghh)

I am an amateur woodworker who is not comfortable with paint. In particular, recent wood projects that called for paint I've used an oil-based enamel but constantly fighting brush marks or orange peels. Out of frustration I purchased a can of acrylic enamel that was water based. I applied one coat of the water-based paint to the top of a desk I'm distressing (and distressed-ha) that I had already sanded the previous finish off, applied 1-2 coats of primer, and 2+ coats of oil-based enamel. I was quite astonished to find that one hastily applied coat of the water-based paint settled better that the oil based. Oh, and I've tried (with the oil-based) to use conditioners to assist in the leveling.

General suggestions would be greatly appreciated in terms of a simpler approach...but in particular, are there any cardinal rules I have broken by applying a water-based paint on top of an oil-based paint? Other than it sounds rediculous I admit.

One other thought...please assume I'm referring to interior projects. Thx!!!
Thanks!!!!
 
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Old 04-07-07, 03:04 PM
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Well, usually you should apply a coat of solvent-based primer on top of oil based paints or enamels before applying any water-based finishes

You may be OK, if it's not doing any alligator/fisheye/orangepeel things
But I wouldn't count on it working every time

If you found a finish that suits your needs (levels out brush marks well), then stay with that
Just use that water-based enamel over your primer coat instead of the oil-based that had you fighting brush marks
 
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Old 04-07-07, 05:02 PM
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The only time I've had problems with oil-based enamels was when I mistakenly grabbed the wrong type of brush. If apply oil-based paints, use a brush made for oil-based paints. It makes a difference.

Another difference is the quality of your tools. A $100 table saw is harder to use and just doesn't perform as well as a $500 saw. A $50 fence is no way near as accurate as a $200 fence. Same applies to your brushes and paints. To do a quality job, a $2 brush isn't going to cut it. And the big box paints just don't measure up to paints from a paint store.
 
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Old 04-08-07, 08:23 PM
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Well, here is the deal with oil based paint. A good quality oil can be applied with a whisk broom and it will lay out smooth. If you use penetrol, read the label, it says mix this quart for up to one gallon of paint. Basically, what that means is due to the VOC changes in recent years we took out this quart of what you need to make this product flow well.

If by chance you used sherwin williams oils, then even that quart of pentrol will yeild poor results. Try a Pratt & Lambert oil or Benjamin Moore, comes in quarts too. My P&L rep assures me the P&L oil is different than the SW oils, incl. proclassic oil even tho P&L is owned by SW.

Some people think a few cap fulls of pene makes a difference but its all in their head.
 
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Old 04-14-07, 11:46 AM
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Thanks

Thank you to all those who replied!!
 
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Old 04-14-07, 12:05 PM
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Originally Posted by jackpaulh View Post
If by chance you used sherwin williams oils, then even that quart of pentrol will yeild poor results. Try a Pratt & Lambert oil or Benjamin Moore, comes in quarts too. My P&L rep assures me the P&L oil is different than the SW oils, incl. proclassic oil even tho P&L is owned by SW.

Some people think a few cap fulls of pene makes a difference but its all in their head.
I would hesitate to use 25% reduction of material as a catch all for flow issues.

BTW SW uses different formulations for different parts of the country for its oil based paints, as do most national paint companies. CA is much more restrictive on the amount of VOC than say IL. So depending upon where you are, the oil may act differently than where the OP is.

Penetrol is NOT a substitute for all the goodies that VOC reduction laws have removed. Also, if this painter is doing this commerically, IE a wood shop, re-introducing VOC into the paint (adding penetrol) can get him in HOT water with the EPA. Granted your typical painter is not going to have an issue with thinning material, but commerical shops (trim shops, door shops, etc) can have serious problems following your advice. If it was not a problem, the paint compaies would simply have a 1qrt can sidecar with the paint with all of the VOC's that were removed.

I would look at temp of shop, type of air movement, and age of material before jumping to far.

OP have you discussed this with the paint store? What oil were you using? Looking for your response.
 
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