Sprayer Or Brush


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Old 04-11-07, 01:45 PM
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Thumbs up Sprayer Or Brush

I have been volunteered by Pops to paint my sisters home, Thank you dad.
I was planning on eventually painting my own home so this will be good practice. Last time I attempted this feat I was 12 years old in Sacramento painting my aunts home. Don't remember it much and im sure it looks like hell now!
To the point. I am interested in using a sprayer on this home. It has wood siding and I believe the paint is oil based. I am a mechanic and have a large appreciation for the right tools especially the latest thing. I have a large desire to attempt the sprayer but could use some advise. I need to do the job right. Thanks for your time.
 
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Old 04-11-07, 06:15 PM
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Can you clarify - you're painting the outside of the house?
 
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Old 04-11-07, 07:01 PM
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While spraying can speed up the paint job there are other things to consider. It is often preferable to back brush or back roll paint that is applied by spray to work the paint into the substrate = better longer lasting job. There is also the concern with overspray. Spraying takes a little getting used to - more to it than just pullling the trigger.

If you do buy an airless, the piston pumps will outlast a diaphram pump. It is also nice to have a pump that you can readily get repair parts for. Life is too short to have a spray tip that isn't reversible. And of course the better the spray pump, the more it costs.
 
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Old 04-11-07, 07:25 PM
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OP,

If this is your first EXTERIOR job and you are using oil? Spraying would NOT be for you. Brush or roll is your best bet.

Latex dries in about 10' out of the sprayer. Oil takes slightly longer, about 500' or so. So unless you are ready to both paint the house and file insurance papers to replace your neighbors house, and car paint jobs, brush and roll.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 12:09 PM
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Question Sprayer or Brush

Sooooo, looks like u recommend that I not use the sprayer?
Yes, it is the outside of the house.
Just don't want to spend amonth painting the house & I wan't to learn how to use a sprayer. Any ADVICE would be appreciated. Not worried about the neighbors car or house I don't see that being a problem. Thanks for your time

Can I roll a wood sided house with an oil based paint? I thought you were supposed to brush?

If i do buy a sprayer any rec's? Of course tha won't break the bank...if that's possible...lol
 
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Old 04-12-07, 12:31 PM
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For the most part oil base paint can be applied in the same manner as latex. Lap siding is usually painted with a brush or spray. When spraying siding it makes for a better job if you back brush the spray coat [works the paint into the surface instead of laying on top - less likelyhood of thin spots] There are some that will use a 4" roller to help speed up the painting.

But let's back up a minute. I assume you plan to use oil base because that is what's on the siding now. What shape is the paint job in? If it is all well weathered and needing primer, why not switch to latex?

I'm the wrong one to give advice on cheaper airless's. I don't know that I've ever used one that didn't retail for $1500+
 
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Old 04-12-07, 12:42 PM
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Why buy? If this is a 1 time job, I would rent if you are really dying to spray.

Most professional paint stores rent airless, and cut you a deal on rate if you also buy paint from them. The upshot is that they will give you a safety lesson, and general tips on operation. I would also ask for 100' hose so you are not forever getting off your scaffold to move the pump.

Then when you are done, return it, and don't worry about storage, etc.

If you do your prep ahead of time (IE All day Friday) taping windows, scraping, sanding, spot priming, etc, should be finished by Monday morning to return the sparyer.

Most paint shops have a 'weekend' rate as a lot of pros take the weekend off, and the equipment sits idle.

Again, I don't know by your comment if you don't belive me about overspray, or your neighbors are REALLY far away. Oil paint goes forever in the air before drying. It is very expensive to repaint a car because you didn't think the advice you got was good.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 01:16 PM
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Thumbs up Sprayer

The existing paint is very poor-down to the wood in some spots.
Groundbeef, Not discarding your advice my comments are based on lack of knowledge.
Based on condition of existing paint(poor)should I switch to different kind of paint(latex). The more I read a 4 inch brush is starting to look good!
Let's try this:
I am painting the exterior of my sisters home. Been at least 20 years since painted. The paint is in very poor condition down to wood in some areas. I have never used airless. Outside of prep:sanding,scraping,patching,priming especially worn areas,taping,caulking windows and doors, what should I do. Roll?Brush?What type of paint(oil now)? Looks like I'm gonna have to repair gutters also. Jeeezzz, I'm tired already,haven't even started. Thanks
 
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Old 04-12-07, 01:38 PM
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Scrap spraying.

Scrape, Sand, and spot prime.

Power washing will go a long way with scraping. Be careful not to splinter the wood. If you get the right rig, you can also inject a cleaner/mildicide into the water stream. Make sure to get the low pressure nozzle for this part. The rince. If you PW, give the house a week to dry out.

If I were going to do it, I wouldn't want to do it again.

SW A-100 Oil primer is the best. Very slow dry. I would do it 1 weekend before for proper dry time. If more than 50% of the home is down to bare, prime it all.

Then topcoat with either A-100 Latex, or SuperPaint.

As the best system, you can go with Sherwin Williams (SW) Duration coating.

It runs about $47/gallon, but is self priming on bare wood, eliminating the primer step. It is a lifetime warrenty for the homeowner, just have them put their name on the receipt.

I would still either power wash, or sand and scrape.

A 4", or even a 5-6" brush will give you the best coverage. You are working it into the wood, and it will last a long time.

Good luck!
 
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Old 04-12-07, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by groundbeef View Post
you can go with Sherwin Williams (SW) Duration coating.
It runs about $47/gallon, but is self priming on bare wood, eliminating the primer step.
If you use Duration I'd still recomend priming since you have so much raw wood. IMO self priming is best when there is a limitted amount of raw wood.

I've gotten good results with both A-100 and super paint over A-100 primer!
 
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Old 04-12-07, 02:27 PM
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Question Why Latex?

Why switch to latex? Just for my knowledge, and are the a-100's an SW paint? Thanks
 
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Old 04-12-07, 03:27 PM
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Oil Primer penetrates the wood better (sloooooow drying)

Latex topcoat is more flexible over time (expansion and contraction of wood), so it is less prone to peeling and flaking.

Oil chalks fairly soon, and starts to peel thereafter.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 05:02 PM
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A-100, super paint and duration are all SWP products.

Oil base paint isn't quite as good as it used to be and latex coatings are way better than they used to be. Exterior latex paint almost always lasts longer than a comparable oil base.
 
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Old 04-26-07, 07:23 AM
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I am by no means an expert. I painted my exterior last year - was in terrible shape.

Spent two days prepping - which means scraping and sanding.

I bought a $200 wagner sprayer at HD. Came with a power sander that was nuts to use - very powerful and not forgiving.

I have never used a sprayer and I did OK (or so I think). I did put the cars in the street - about 75 feet away. And two days I did not spray as it was a bit breezy.

If you have any mechanical aptitude I think you can do this. The key is arm movement - slow and steady - but not too slow.

What worked fo rme was: prep then prime (2 coats) then cut around windows etc. then spray the lastly do the trim. When you spray you will get paint in the trim.

I tried taping the windows and covering with plastic - first 2 took 30 minutes and I have over 20 - so I didn;t cover the rest - as I said painted the trim last and also used a razor blase on teh window glass to get off the over spray.

Good luck let us know how it turns out. Feel free to ask more Q's - you prob know DIY saves thoudsands - saved me about $5 or $6 grand.
 
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Old 04-26-07, 07:45 AM
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An good alternative to masking is using a spray shield.
 
 

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