Lacquer coat on steel


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Old 04-11-07, 10:56 PM
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Lacquer coat on steel

I wonder if anyone can help with this question. I recently built an all steel table (workbench) and am using a lacquer top coat over some metallic paint. However, I'm having difficutly getting a uniform shine - I've applied 3 coats and some areas look more glossy than others.

Any ideas as to why that is happening. One solution would be to polish the surface so that the really shiny areas would get duller so that it would have a more unform look. If so any suggestions as to how to best do this.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 03:31 AM
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Hello,
Generally uneven sheen is caused by low temperatures &/or temperature variations of the coated surface.
Bringing the workpiece up to room temperature - 70F or so - for a good 12 hours, then keeping it at that temperture for another 12 hours after coating, should eliminate that possiblity.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 05:56 AM
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Also because lacquer tends to dry quickly it is imperitive the it be applied wet. Are you spraying or brushing?
 
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Old 04-12-07, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Also because lacquer tends to dry quickly it is imperitive the it be applied wet. Are you spraying or brushing?
As with most coatings we STRONGLY suggest they be applied wet.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 09:22 AM
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I'm spraying it out of a can - the manufacturer is Rust-oleum. I'm not sure I understand what is meant by applying it wet.

Would brushing it on be a better approach.

The temp around here is around 65 - 70F during the day (work is being done in the garage) so I'm not sure temp/humidity is an issue.
 

Last edited by rav12; 04-12-07 at 09:33 AM.
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Old 04-12-07, 09:51 AM
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2 points.

If using aerosol, make sure to spray a stroke, and shake the can. Your uneven finish could be a result of flateners settling in the can during application. If you shake it well to start, but don't shake anymore during application it can cause the problems you are having. Even full gloss lacquers contain some flatteners.

As far as "apply it wet", it was more of a friendly jab at Marksr, in reply to his comment about "it is imperitive the it be applied wet.". It is imperitive that ALL paint be applied wet. Kinda hard to apply it if its already dry right?
 
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Old 04-12-07, 09:57 AM
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OK thanks. I do shake the can well before application but I guess I did not keep shaking it during application. As for the "applying it wet" - I also had the same thought - is there any other way :-)

Maybe I should try brushing it on - maybe easier to get a uniform gloss.

Any tips on polishing the coat
 
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Old 04-12-07, 10:27 AM
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No, brushing is out at this point.

Laquer doesn't brush. Flashes off to quickly and every brush mark would stand out on that smooth surface.

2nd, "Lacquer" in a can is not really lacquer, nor is it really oil paint. Sort of a hybrid.

Plus with several coats now your in real danger of peeling and flaking. I would say at this point leave it alone. If you are really going to use this bench, I don't think its going to be shiny for long anyway.

Incidently, why didn't you take the steel to a local fabricator and have them powder coat them? It would have been uniform, and much more durable.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 11:01 AM
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Yes, powdercoating would have been a good option. I did consider it but decided agaist it just due to the effort of getting the assembled table to the fabricator as it weighs about 220lbs. I guess I could have taken the inidvidual pieces before assembly.

As it going to be a workbench for doing projects on including automotive repair and metalworking the look is no big deal - I was more concerned about the finish being durable enought to withstand all this and not end up damaging the actual steel plate itself.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 11:34 AM
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My friend, your coating isn't going to afford you very much protection at all.

When dry, a properly applied coating is approximatly the thickness of a plastic wrap on a cigarette packet.

With the paint, and now the lacquer coating, you have approximated the thickness of 1 sheet of notebook paper.

I think the steel will fare better than the paint.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 11:40 AM
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What I meant by 'applying the material wet' was to apply a heavy wet coat so that each pass goes on next to wet paint and not next to an already drying paint. I'm probably not explaining it the best but hopefully you understand what I mean
 
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Old 04-12-07, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
What I meant by 'applying the material wet' was to apply a heavy wet coat so that each pass goes on next to wet paint and not next to an already drying paint. I'm probably not explaining it the best but hopefully you understand what I mean
Its funnier when you don't explain it. I think you were trying to say that with lacquer it is difficult to maintain a 'wet edge'. This helps eliminate lap marks.

But as you pointed out, brushing lacquer and no lap marks is not really an option.

Again, its always funny when comments are A) taken out of context, B) not your own. Thanks for being a good sport.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by groundbeef View Post
I think you were trying to say that with lacquer it is difficult to maintain a 'wet edge'. This helps eliminate lap marks.
That is what I was trying to spit out some days my thinking cap doesn't fit well.
 
 

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