Exterior Painting Uniformity Question


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Old 04-16-07, 10:54 AM
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Exterior Painting Uniformity Question

Hello:

We are having new siding put up on only 3 sides of house.
Will have to match the paint color for the painting of the new siding against what is presently on the side that is not to be re-sided.

Will use a piece of the old siding as a color match which, I'm told, they can do very accurately at the paint stores using a "photometric" device.

How true is this; a "real good" match to be expected ?

What I'm also interested in before I have any painters over is the following:

I'm assuming that at the paint store they (can) only mix up the
colors for 1 gal cans at a time with the correct pigment (on the basis of the photometer).

So, how does one insure that all the cans they do this way are
really identical ?
It's hard to believe that if each can is done individually, there are not slight differences in shade, etc., no matter how accurately the pigments are dispensed.

Can they do, e.g., a larger volume than 1 gal (at a time) ?

Or, does one insist that the painter mix in a large jug at least 5 gallons or so, so that at least each side of the house is identical and uniform ?

How is this "problem" usually handled, please ?

Thanks,
Bob
 
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Old 04-16-07, 11:31 AM
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Why pray tell are you painting 3 sides? Why not paint the old side to match the new?

If you must paint the new stuff, throughly CLEAN the old siding before color match.

Matching by computer is great.....as a first step. If you go to a big box, thats what you get. It'll be close, but if not a match, well to bad for you.

A paint store will make sure to tighten up the match after the computer makes it suggestion.

Don't expect it in 10 minutes. Drop it off, and come back later.

Always 'Box' you paint. That means, mix them all toghther to ensure consistancy gallon to gallon. Or better yet get a 5 gallon bucket of the product. Chances are, the paint store will prefer to mix in 1 gallon, as if the match fails they are only out 1 gallon. This is ok, just ask them to match gallon price w/5 gallon price
 
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Old 04-16-07, 04:42 PM
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I would add that a real paint store does a better job at both matching existing paint and duplicating it with every gallon - even 1 gal versus 5 gal. It is still a good idea to box the paint!

While the color can be matched, expect there to be a little difference between old and new paint. If budget allows, paint it all.
 
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Old 04-16-07, 07:28 PM
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I have been painting for 17 years. I have only had one time when the color from one gallon did not match the color from another. I bought each gallon from different independent dealers of Ben Moore paints. They clearly had different tint dispensers of make and age. I just don't buy from independent dealers any more.

I never box my paint. Good paint stores check their dispensers on a regular basis and replace worn out parts. I'm just not worried about it.

Also good paint stores are like a barber shop. The people that work there know the gossip about the contractors. Painters get lonely and love to talk. When you are taking bids on your house go to the paint store, get a free cup of coffee, tell them about your project and who you have bidding on it. You might get some good info to help you decide.
 
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Old 04-16-07, 10:48 PM
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Let me reiterate that you should box your paint. I worked at a paint store for several years, and we make mistakes. Now, we stood by our mistakes, but it can be very costly for both parties(money for us). As for matching, exterior paints are a bit tricky. Certain sides get different amounts of sun, and even on that one side, there will be different shades. The biggest help you can be for the matcher is to bring in a BIG sample. It used to drive us nuts when people brought in paint scrapings and then complained about the quality of the match. With a big enough sample, we used to be able to get it pretty damn close. Good luck with your endeavor, and always box your paint!

P.S. a paint store will out match home depot/lowes 99% percent of the time.
 
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Old 04-17-07, 12:00 PM
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Matching

Yeah definately go to a REAL paint store (not Lowe's or Depot) Paint matching is elementary to a true paint store - they are done ALL THE TIME.

That being said, you are dealing with tinters which are not always perfect (over 99.9% effective from my experience). The key is to leave as little time between getting paint tinted because tinters can change and so can batches of paint.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 04-17-07, 06:00 PM
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A real paint store will get it pretty darn good
But they will get it as close as possible, then there's a personal judgment call as to how exact is exact

If the base is available in 5 gal drums, they can tint it in 5 gal. drums

If it's only available in 1 gal. cans, you "box" or mix the cans together so any discrepancies are mixed in together...so the discrepancies disappear

Todays Paint Stores (I wouldn't say all paint depts.) tinting is very precise, down to 1% of a gallon, and computer controlled

Boxing for the most part may not be needed, but couldn't hurt, and will insure uniformity if something was amiss...in other words, it's not a bad habit to get into, and it could save a project

With matching an old piece of siding such as you are doing, and only painting three sides (which would be highly unusual), I would state in the contract that the paint will be matched as close as possible, and there will be no guarantees of the color matching exactly.

It's simply not possible to match an entire side of weathered, UV exposed, rained on, paint exactly (the whole side will vary slightly)

The proper solution is to paint the whole house
 
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Old 04-18-07, 07:24 AM
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in a nut shell

The exact color might be replicated but the effects of the weather on the old sidng's paint won't be on the new paint which leaves the possibility of it "looking" different.
 
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Old 04-18-07, 08:29 PM
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Here is the main reason I don't box m paint.

Let's say you buy 4 gallons. One of them is shot wrong. If you box them out of habit then you just burned 4 gallons at your expense. If you don't box them you can take the one bad gallon back to the store and get it replaced for free.
If the paint store's dispensers can't dispense the same amount of colorant each time on the same setting then you need to go some where else.

What if you need another gallon down the road but you boxed in a mis-tint with out knowing it. Then your new gallon won't match and you are stuck with trying to match the new color you didn't know you had.

Also, when you box paint you end up with paint high up on the inside of a 5 gallon bucket which will dry as the day goes on. If you are useing a roller and screen you will be knocking off dryed paint into your paint and the transfering it on to the surface you are painting.

To me it's wasted time and energy.
 
 

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