Painting cement floor

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  #1  
Old 04-17-07, 08:22 AM
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Painting cement floor

I have a cement floor in my workshop area. It is in the condition as when it was finished in the intial pouring of the lower slab foundation for the house. This area is on the lower level and has raised boundary around the two outside sides, and the two X four frame on the other two sides. The epoxy and cement paints I looked at require the use of an etching or bonding preconditioner. The problem is these etching products specify application with watering cans and extensive rinsing with a garden hose. With the raised boundary, I have no way to remove the rinse water and I am concerned with its effect on the two X fours and / or getting under them into the finished rooms on the other side. Can you suggest a solution? Can I just paint the floor with the epoxy? Are there other paint/stain type alternatives?
 
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Old 04-17-07, 11:01 AM
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Best advice is to NOT PAINT YOUR FLOOR.

Unless you are prepared to prep the floors (including etching, and and neutralizing the acid, and rinsing) FORGET IT.

You should look into either floor mats, or some other solution.

Unless you like the blistering, peeling, chipping, and flaking look. Then go right ahead and paint away.

Seriously. Don't do it. Even with proper floor prep, floors are tricky.
 
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Old 04-17-07, 11:10 AM
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Have you thought about using a concrete stain?
 
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Old 04-17-07, 11:46 AM
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Concrete Floor

There are products (even epoxies) that do not require an etch. It depends on the profile of the concrete. An etch is performed so that the concrete feels like 100 grit sandpaper. If your concrete already feels like that, then you don't have a whole lot of prep required.

Take your hand and feel the concrete, if it feels almost like sandpaper, do a test patch.

What kind of traffic will this be subjected to? That will determine which coating to use so let me know.
 
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Old 04-17-07, 01:18 PM
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I would avoid coating the floor without an etch. I guess if it was broom finished MAYBE it would adhere. However, the OP would still need to perform a moisture test, and other prep.

With the case presented initially, I would advise OP to not coat the floor.
 
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Old 04-17-07, 03:18 PM
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Thank you for all your suggestions. The floor is in my personal workshop so traffic will be minimal except for me. It already has a shiny surface, but I have had to fill a lot of areas that had swirls from the finisher. Those areas have the sandpaper finish. I have considered the stain, but the ones that I looked at also required the etching / bonding pre work. I really would like to paint the floor, but I do not want the peeling / flaking that sometimes occurs even with the etching. Is there actually and epoxy that does not require the etching pre coat?
 
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Old 04-17-07, 05:04 PM
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Not that I would use. Floors are tricky beasts. If this was above grade, perhaps it would be more sucessful.

Moisture will be your biggest problem, followed by general adhesion issues.

Concrete typically has a curing agent applied, and it gives the floor a smooth slick feel. If not removed by etching, its going to give out. Amount of traffic is not really a factor, unless you are using steel wheels on your carts. If its going to fail, its going to fail.

I would look into mats, or leave alone. Stains will not really cover your patches,as they tend to be absorbed into the floor, but since some is glossy/some flat, it wouldn't look very good.

Without good prep, your better off leaving well enough alone.
 
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Old 04-17-07, 05:45 PM
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I have successfully used a latex floor enamel (Ben Moore's Porch & Floor Enamel) in this type of situation numerous times
Without seeing yours, I can't give my opinion as to whether or not it's a good candidate
But it is an alternative to epoxy/stain
 
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Old 04-17-07, 11:38 PM
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I was preparing to paint my basement floor with an Epoxy for cement floors. I've seen it in business and places and was told that it was great stuff and held up nicely. They also make one for garages(it isn't sensitive to heat from tires). Everyone I've talked to swears by it. I've seen it first hand in the beauty shop that I go to and the car repair shop and also many other places. I am really surprise to hear any bad reviews on this product.
 
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Old 04-18-07, 05:40 AM
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you could try scarating it. Think of this as a big electric sander for concrete.
 
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Old 04-18-07, 07:31 AM
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Epoxy is AWESOME on floors. Provided you have done your prep, and moisture is not a concern.

I epoxyied my garage and was very happy with results for the 5 years I was in the house. I used W/B Epoxy in my dads basement workshop, and it came out like a dream.

I also demo'd a job with a contactor in a spec house w/epoxy and they were sold thereafter.

BUT, all jobs were properly prepared, and moisture tests indicated that hydrostatic pressure was minimal-to no existant.

Its not the product, its the prep that makes the job (The better product will last longer, but with poor prep, it wont last any longer than poor product).

Mechanical scaration would work, as well as sandblasting. Neither are really appropriate for the OP's situation as it is a small area. You would either need to rent the equipment or pay a contractor. Hardly seems worth the expense.
 
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Old 04-19-07, 04:35 AM
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I disagree about the scaration not being appropriate for the job, the machine is usually cheap to rent and fairly fast. If he does not want to use a etching type product then this is all he has left.

If you fail to do any prep, then the epoxy will probably fail. Overall epoxy is the best way to go.
 
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Old 04-19-07, 07:31 AM
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I'll defer to your judgement on machine rental. Frankly I have never had the occasion to rent one, so I have no idea what it would cost.

Sandblasting however, would still be out of the question.
 
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Old 04-21-07, 01:01 PM
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I just want to again thank all of you who provide this board with the advice. It is certainly a great help to me. I would like some more of it. My area is about 250 sq ft. Is the scarating appropriate for an enclosed area? If I did the scarating, could a concrete stain then be used instead of the epoxy? What type of safety precautions is appropriate for the scarating?
 
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Old 04-22-07, 12:12 PM
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you can use a scarator in an enclosed area with venitaltion. you will want at least a dust mask. when you are done the floor should feel like you sanded it with about a 60 grit paper. rougher is ok but smoother is not . after you scareate it, there is a powder that you put down to help collect the dust as sweep.
 
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Old 05-17-08, 03:55 PM
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To marksr, Hi, I have a question for you, I have a small cement patio where my dad sits to watch the birds and squirrles. He likes to read out there as well, but the problem is there is a glare from the cement and this affects his eyes which are bad and this makes it harder from him to read. I didn't know you could tint your cement before you pour it so now we would like to paint it so there isn't a glare. What do you recommend? Thanks, sandy
 
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Old 05-18-08, 03:36 AM
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Originally Posted by groundbeef View Post
Best advice is to NOT PAINT YOUR FLOOR.

Unless you are prepared to prep the floors (including etching, and and neutralizing the acid, and rinsing) FORGET IT.

You should look into either floor mats, or some other solution.

Unless you like the blistering, peeling, chipping, and flaking look. Then go right ahead and paint away.

Seriously. Don't do it. Even with proper floor prep, floors are tricky.
I second that. After 2 years, our porch paint on our backyard patio flaked off in the high traffic areas. What a mess! And yes, we etched our cement with the acid prior to paint.
 
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Old 05-18-08, 06:11 AM
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Hi Sandy

Use a concrete stain. One of the problems with using paint on a patio slab is there is no vapor barrier underneath and if any moisture rises thru the slab it will make the paint peel. Even on an interior concrete floor it is difficult to keep paint from peeling.

Your local paint store [not dept] should have a good stain for you to use - they will also have good localized advice to help you have a successfull coating job.
 
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Old 05-18-08, 09:19 AM
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Successful Stain

Just wanted to let all know that I did use the scarrating technique and then used a stain from Lowe's. I applied it with an ordinary pump sprayer. It worked wonderfully, and so far, it has held up real well. The only draw back so far is that if a piece of heavy equipment is dragged across it, it will scratch. Thanks to all who contributed their time and advice to this novice and helped create a success.
 
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Old 05-18-08, 12:16 PM
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Red face Cement Stain Or Paint

Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Hi Sandy

Use a concrete stain. One of the problems with using paint on a patio slab is there is no vapor barrier underneath and if any moisture rises thru the slab it will make the paint peel. Even on an interior concrete floor it is difficult to keep paint from peeling.

Your local paint store [not dept] should have a good stain for you to use - they will also have good localized advice to help you have a successfull coating job.
I want to thank marksr. I was thinking that there had to be some draw back to painting rather than staining. I actually didn't know you could stain cement until I went to home depot and tried to get green paint (as thats the color he wants) and they couldn't tint it because they weren't compatible with the cement paint I had picked out. Thanks again for your help, sandy. PS. My dad thanks you also.
 
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