bathroom paint cracking above shower


  #1  
Old 04-19-07, 02:19 PM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 71
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
bathroom paint cracking above shower

Two years ago, I removed my bath room wall paper because of mold problem, and I repainted the walls and ceiling with the regular white paint from Home Depot. No primer.

Today, after just two years, the area right above the shower is cracking like a spider web and peeling in some areas. I do not have a ventilation fan and do not plan to install one since that might be a little too large of a project to handle at this point, since I either have to open the wall to outside with a hole, or open the ceiling to the roof which is very narrow space and not easy to crawl in there. I do have a window, but for privacy we do not like to open the window when we leave the house in the mornings. Therefore, moisture is being trapped inside the bathroom.

So, I am thinking of tackling my moisture problems (now that I have done a kitchen project and know a little bit more than 2 years ago. <grin>):

1. scrape and sand all loose paint down.
2. apply a very thin layer of mud to the wall and ceiling to smooth out the uneven areas. Use mud tape if necessary.
3. sand smooth the mud.
4. apply primer from Bejamin Moore store.
5. apply 2 coats of Bejamin Moore paint specially designed for bathroom and moisture resistance to walls and ceiling. (I do not know if they have any, or what name of paint to use yet.)

There are a lot more steps this time, and not exactly a weekend project anymore like what I did 2 years ago.

Now, will this prevend the ceiling right above shower from cracking anymore? Do I need to do anything more to ensure that?

Thanks
fh
 
  #2  
Old 04-19-07, 03:15 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,630
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
You're going to have a better chance this way, but getting the moisture out is still something that should be addressed. How about running a dehumidifier nearby?
 
  #3  
Old 04-19-07, 04:31 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,072
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
.... or at least leave the door open so some of the humidity can escape the room.

I think the problem may have been aggravated by not completely removing all the wallpaper adhesive or sealing it with the proper primer. Using a good latex enamel [which BM has] will help a lot. But there's no good substitute for an exhaust fan.
 
  #4  
Old 04-19-07, 04:47 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Your plan is sound, and short of other (non-painting) steps to prevent moisture build-up such as mentioned above, is the best way to address this project

The primer would be Fresh Start (water-based)
The paint would be "Moore's K & B" (Kitchen and Bath)

What color is the bathroom going to be?
 
  #5  
Old 04-20-07, 03:17 PM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 71
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi, thanks for all your responses. The color would be white.
 
  #6  
Old 04-20-07, 06:32 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
White?
Use Zinsser's Perma-White for paint then
Absolutely the most m/m resistant paint for bathrooms
It's also "self-priming"
You'll still want to prime, but that "self-priming" feature in the paint coat means even less of a chance of failure in a heinously moist environment

I personally had the tiny bathroom in an 1800s house, two girls that loved long hot showers and no fan...and to top it off the washing machine was in there
I was X-14ing (mildecide) that place every 4 weeks max (often every two)
After the Perma-White I never needed mildecide again

The Moore's K&B is great
The Z's Perma-White is better
Only problem is Perma-White doesn't tint past light/pastels very well
For white though...it's the best
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: