Spraying interior latex with an airless sprayer


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Old 04-24-07, 09:06 PM
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Spraying interior latex with an airless sprayer

Hello everyone,
I'm new to the board here, but not new to construction. I've had the opportunity in the past to use an airless sprayer extensivly in the automotive and trucking industry. Spraying mainly enamel, polyurethane, epoxies and various marine grade coatings. I eventually moved into home renovation and decided to try my hand spraying latex. I just got done renovating an apartment and seemed to get good results using cheap paint($8/gal), but trying to stay within the budget parameters set by the landlord left me wondering if using a better quality paint(say $20/gal) would have saved money in the long run. I know that brushing or rolling cheap paint can require several coats. And I know a better quality paint will require less coats brushing or rolling. I was wondering if the same better coverage would apply to using a better quality paint using the spray method and amount to any kind of substantial savings?
Thanx in advance for reading.
Jim
 
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Old 04-25-07, 06:47 AM
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A cheap latex might come out the spray tip better but because of all the differences between cheap and quality coatings it may not lay on the wall/ceiling as well. A cheaper coating may run/sag quicker than a quality one. Also cheaper coatings often require straining to make the coating sprayable, although it is best to strain all paint prior to spraying.

Generally a quality coating covers and wears better than it's cheap counterpart. IMO a quality coating gives a better looking finish product. On new work the cheap paints mostly color the wall where a better paint will both be and look like a good paint job.

It is hard to judge whether or not there is a monetary savings to spray on a generic repaint. While it's usually benifical to spray new construction, repaints normally require more cover up/masking and it is usually determined on a job to job basis whether or not it is benifical to use an airless.
 
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Old 04-25-07, 07:21 AM
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Thanx for the reply marksr. One thing I did notice is a fine line between complete coverage and a sag in the paint. One split second too long in one area and ooops. Knowing this I think I will try a better quality paint next time (especially using a deeper tint) because runs will ruin any paint job.

I actually remember spraying some paints refered to as high-build and you couldn't get these paints to run if you tried.

Thanx again
Jim
 
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Old 04-25-07, 07:36 AM
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I've sprayed a LOT of high build primer and it can run/sag but because of the way it is formulated it can tolerate a heavy film being applied. Uneven application can show [unless sanded] in the finish coat.

Because of the higher amount of pigments, dark colors are often troublesome to work with. I wouldn't want to have to use a deep base in a cheap paint
 

Last edited by marksr; 04-25-07 at 09:44 AM. Reason: add info
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Old 04-25-07, 11:17 AM
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OP< as your past experience dictates, I don't think that backrolling came up. One way to avoid sags is to 'backroll' the paint quickly after application. This works the material, and helps even off the finish.

Also, when you go to touch up later, it is much easier as the wall has the roller texture.

Hope that helps.

BTW, it IS easier to make a crappy finish look good with a sprayer as you can apply it easier with the sprayer, and apply a heavier initial coat.
 
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Old 04-25-07, 03:34 PM
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Hey thanx everyone for all the great info.
In fact I did have to tint some of the cheap paint I was using to cover discoloration in some rooms, and in areas where it did sag/run the pigment was slightly more noticeable.

And GB...hmmmm... what I think you're refering to as backrolling is to take a roller to the surface where the run occured? I didn't have a roller handy, but I kept a brush and a small pail of water hany to swipe any areas where I noticed a run. A roller would probably be better.
Being that it was flat, not a glitch was noticeable after it dried.

BTW I also had very pleasing results using what's called "eggshell" in the bathroom and kitchen. Nice hard, smooth finish. Yet not chalky like true flat.
Thanx again.
Jim
 
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Old 04-25-07, 07:28 PM
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Back rolling is where you spray the coating on a surface and then take a roller and go back over it. This helps to work the paint into porous surfaces and may also level the paint out some. It is easier to touch up brush and rolled paint than it is just sprayed on paint.
 
 

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