Eggshell finish problem over Killz


  #1  
Old 04-30-07, 12:08 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 11
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Eggshell finish problem over Killz

Hello. I recently moved into a house with some drywall problems on the bottom half of all the walls. We repaired the damage (cutting out bubbles, coat of polyurethane, coat of mud). I then primed them using Killz, but just the bottom half. After that dried, I applied an eggshell finish paint over the entire wall. The coat covering the primed areas took a lot longer to dry as it was clearly less thirsty than the top half. It has been a full day now, and the bottom half of the walls are still noticeably glossier than the rest of the wall, and much glossier than I have come to expect from an eggshell finish. My questions are:

1. Given enough time, will the bottom half of the walls ever look like the top half, or does the absorbency permanently impact the gloss level?

2. If I am going to need to prime the entire surface in order achieve consistency, is there anyway to get the eggshell finish I was expecting? (by applying an flat paint, maybe?)

Thanks in advance. If this is already covered, please feel free to direct me to the appropriate thread.
Travis
 
  #2  
Old 04-30-07, 02:17 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,396
Received 721 Upvotes on 632 Posts
Why did you apply a coat of poly prior to the j/c? or have I misunderstood?

Having a better primer/sealer will make eggshell [or any enamel] hold more of a gloss. Enamels don't usually touch up as good as flat paint does. Assuming you don't have a chair rail seperating the 2 paint jobs it is likely that you will need to recoat the entire wall to get it to blend. The finish product will probably have the higher sheen that the bottom now has.

While there are some differences between the level of sheen of different products, flat paints are fairly uniniformly flat and enamels have close sheens for particular one used [satin, gloss,etc] Painting the wall with flat will not result in an eggshell finish. You could add a little flat latex to eggshell latex and tone down the sheen BUT it must be mixed well and might never be duplicated!!!
 
  #3  
Old 04-30-07, 02:39 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
Hmmm...you should have primed the whole thing to avoid this type of problem
It's possible it could even out
It's possible it could be another issue
Hard to say from here, w/o more specifics

Which Kilz and which paint did you use?
 
  #4  
Old 04-30-07, 02:41 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
"Why did you apply a coat of poly prior to the j/c? or have I misunderstood?"

I'm assuming that's a misunderstanding also
If not, we'll need to discuss how to proceed with poly on the walls
 
  #5  
Old 04-30-07, 02:48 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 11
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the reply. The poly was applied before the j/c at the request of the contractor who applied the j/c. I'm not sure of the reason.

There is no chair rail. The suggestion to mix is a good idea, but I think I might just learn to live with the higher sheen. I will try another coat over what I already have and if that doesn't do it, bite the bullet and prime the top half of the walls.

Thanks again.
 
  #6  
Old 04-30-07, 02:54 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 11
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Slickshift,
I used the Kilz premium and two different brands of paints, one from Sherwin Williams, and one from Lowe's, Valspar I think. Both are showing the same behavior.

Travis
 
  #7  
Old 04-30-07, 02:54 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,396
Received 721 Upvotes on 632 Posts
Sometimes drywall or plaster needs a primer prior to patching but I don't know why the finisher requested poly, it should have been a solvent based primer [when needed]
 
  #8  
Old 04-30-07, 05:16 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
I've heard of finishers requesting an odd coating
I seem to remember it being shellac or something though
The poly doesn't make sense < shrugs >

Though I'm not fond of, and really can't recommend the latex Kilz primers (I was wondering if it was the oil-based, which is very good btw), it really shouldn't be doing that

I would have to assume it's because 1/2 was primered and 1/2 not
But honestly, I wouldn't be surprised if it turned out to be the Kilz latex itself that was the problem

If you didn't want to bite any bullets, the sure-fire fix would be prime the whole wall with a quality primer (Ben Moore Fresh Start, Zinsser's 123, or Sherwin Williams Prep Rite), then paint with a quality paint

If you are willing to take a chance, and can live with it if it doesn't work, another coat over what's up there m i g h t take care of the problem
 
  #9  
Old 05-01-07, 09:23 AM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 11
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
What is done is done on the poly, so I'm just going to pretend that it is doing what it was meant to do.

In the interest of getting the job done right, I'm going to prime the top half of the walls, possibly the entire room, and start from go.

The Kilz premium is actually an acrylic primer , but having revisited the one of rooms painted with SW paint, the paint applied to the primed areas is all streaky and badly covered. I guess it could just be the paint quality, but I'm going to look for a better primer anyhow.

BTW- I also did a test patch using a flat paint of the same color and it came out looking like I was expecting the eggshell to look! A lucky break for me. I clearly have not worked with a primed wall before.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: