Best Primer for new skip trowel ceiling?


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Old 05-05-07, 10:07 AM
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Best Primer for new skip trowel ceiling?

We just had all of our old popcorn ceiling scraped off !!! and retextured and now I have to paint both that and the walls. The drywall contractor told me the ceiling had to be primed but I need help! What type "nap" of roller and what primer? It is a giant job, almost 1500 square feet but the bids are just out of my price range from $1500 and up so I have to do it myself-ugh.

Do I use the same roller for the walls? I don't have to prime the walls, right? They also have the same skip trowel texture and will be the same white color as the ceiling.

Any tips for choosing the right paint? I like the flat look and have that on my walls now. I can wash the walls but was told if I pick flat again, you are not supposed to be able to wash them?! Confused about that but it is really matte, flat, almost looks like chalk finish.

He just finished up yesterday, so about how long to wait before dry? I checked this morning and there are many wet places still.
 
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Old 05-05-07, 01:23 PM
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It's best to wait until it's fully dry
That will depend on humidity etc.

I'd choose your paint first
I'd recommend one of the premiums lines (they all make cheapos too) from Ben Moore, Sherwin Williams, or Pittsburgh
Whichever or more convenient or friendlier...they are all pretty good
Go to a Paint Store though, rather than a paint dept. somewhere

Generally the more sheen, the more washable
Though there are some "washable flats" out there today

A heads up, washable flats are more washable then other flats, but not as washable as washable eggshells, semi-s etc...
They should have a test in the Paint Store...try them out, maybe they'll work for you

You'll need to prime all the new texture
The paint store will recommend one to go with the paint you choose
You can use the same roller if it's the same texture

You can ask at the Paint Store which primer is best for the paint you chose
 
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Old 05-05-07, 02:00 PM
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Ideally you would prime and paint the ceiling but it may be possible to cover it with 1 coat of flat white latex. This may not allow the ceiling paint to be washable but it is a ceiling. You do however need to prime any bath room ceilings.

You should not skimp and not prime the walls, priming the walls will both help to make the finish coat look better and wash better! If you stick with flat paint, the better quality flats are usually more scrubable than the cheaper flat paints. Quality paints also apply and wear better

Depending on how rough/smooth the texture is you will want to use a 1/2" or 3/4" roller nap. Use a 5 gal bucket [w/screen] to roll out of. This will make the job quicker/easier and no worry of stepping in the paint tray
 
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Old 05-06-07, 08:57 AM
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Thank you both for your replies. I just keep looking at the scope of the work and am overwhelmed thinking maybe the price was not too bad after all! It is one thing to do one coat/one room but I really want it to look good. As far as I know, the interior has not been painted in over 20 years!

So I think I will get the pros to do it and am wondering what I can expect/ask for/look out for. Most of the nail holes were filled by the drywaller when he did the ceiling but there are some cracks along the corners of the walls. Is it common to ask for those to be caulked before painting and also will they automatically prime the walls along with the ceiling?

They said they supply the paint and after reading so many posts, I understand that "generally" pros use high quality good paint. Should I insist on a certain paint or just let them do their thing?

I know I want the walls and ceiling flat but am still having trouble deciding on the doorways and other trim. Many of the upscale houses have a matt finish on those as well and ours are generally "satin" but the few that are glossy really look pretty. The glossy ones show every mark! What is the general rule for this?

Also, I just finished removing the wall paper from the kitchen and was pleasantly surprised to find a nice shiny paint underneath. What is this kitchen paint? Enamel? There are a few dents that I know how to fill with the joint compound but what do you do with areas that pop out? Try to sand them down? Pound them in?

Thanks again-my house is starting to look great!!
 
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Old 05-06-07, 09:35 AM
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Most painters will automatically make minor repairs as needed but it is a good idea to ask up front. It is also a good idea to find out what brand and line of paint they intend to use. You can always call the paint store to find out where that line is, quality wise. You can also ask here although we may not be familiar with all brands. When the budget is tight I recomend spending less on ceiling paint rather than skimp on the wall paint.

Semi-gloss enamel is the most commonly used sheen for woodwork. Generally it is decided by personal choice. I prefer gloss

Hold old is your home? It is possible that you might have oil base enamel on the kitchen walls which makes it very easy to strip wallpaper. The repairs are easy - resink any loose nails and fill where needed, sand smooth and prime. If you have oil base enamel you should either stay with oil base or use a solvent based primer to ready the walls for latex paint.
 
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Old 05-06-07, 10:33 AM
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THANKS AGAIN! The house is about 30 years old so I bet you are right that it is the old type of oil based enamel. The wallpaper was fairly easy to remove just by wetting and scraping it although it did take me hours and hours-ugh.

I also have 4 large holes in the ceiling where I ripped out the dropped ceiling and the old light fixtures so I am going to try and repair that and then do some kind of smooth texture coat to try and match the finished part. Now I have a tray ceiling and it looks good. Any tips for patching and filling the holes? They are about 2" wide by 8" long and go straight through to the attic. Can I just put drywall tape and then joint compound? What do I use to smooth coat the ceiling?
 
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Old 05-07-07, 03:50 AM
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You should insert a piece of drywall [probably 1/2"] in holes of that size. If there isn't a handy rafter to secure the drywall to you can either insert a board wider than the hole and screw the surrounding drywall to it, securing it and then screw in your patch. Another method is to cut a piece of drywall about 3" wider than the hole, then from the backside remove all the excess but leaving the extra paper. You then use the paper as you would tape and mud the patch in place.

If you need to make the whole ceiling smooth you may need to skim coat the ceiling with j/c. If you are trying to match the existing ceiling [either slick or orange peel] you may need to lightly texture the repair with thinned down j/c using a sponge. If the texture doesn't come out right first time around it is easy enough to wipe it off when wet or sand off when dry and try again.
 
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Old 05-07-07, 08:43 AM
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Well, inserting drywall sounds like more "professional work" but I did find these metal screen type drywall "patches" yesterday and was going to try and use those. Then I bought 4 pieces of corner bead to make the lower edges of the "tray ceiling" crisp and smooth. How do you attach them to the ceiling? Will the joint compound hold those up or do I need to nail them? Do I need to do something first to the part of the ceiling that is already finished smooth and painted to make the joint compound stick?

Thanks for the tips about making the ceiling smooth! It will look so good when I finish. The inside of the tray, the upper ceiling that had the lights on it, just "looks" unfinished and has no kind of texture so I will use the tips to water down the joint compound and smooth it over.
 
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Old 05-07-07, 01:02 PM
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Corner bead should be nailed in place. Then you apply several coats of j/c over the sides [leave the corner edge showing] sand and reapply as needed and it will be ready for paint. The mud will stick fine to paint, if it's extra glossy it would be a good idea to sand first.

The metal screen should work fine and isn't very hard to do. Make sure the mud dries good before applying your 2nd coat. The only problem with that type of a patch is it is very thin but shouldn't pose a problem on a ceiling.
 
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Old 05-09-07, 08:25 AM
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Well, I gave up on doing this myself! The drywaller is coming back today. At this point it is so worth the extra $150 to me not to have to do it-lol! Really a bargain, I think! At least I know it will look nice, a heck of a lot nicer than the bad corners I did!

Friday the electrician is coming so it is all falling into place nicely except the skylights! This house has 3 4X6 skylights that all have to be replaced and the guy is verrrry laid back. Each one is over $700 and I need them yesterday! He came and measured but did not take a deposit or give me a final price so I guess I have to call the office and light a fire!

Thanks again marksr! This forum has been almost like a life preserver when I am drowning.
 
 

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