sheen for textured walls


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Old 05-07-07, 03:56 PM
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sheen for textured walls

I am getting ready to paint wood paneling that is seriously textured. Picture a pulling a hair comb over a flat piece of clay to get the idea. The ripples are about 1/8 inch deep and are in the up-down direction. This is paneling from the 1950's or 1960's which I have only seen one other place. It is a basement. I can't decide between semi-gloss and satin sheen. Is there a general recommendation for textured walls?
thanks,
Priscilla
 
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Old 05-07-07, 04:20 PM
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Flat paints and textured walls absorb light, so colors seem darker. Glossy paints and smooth surfaces reflect, so colors look brighter. If you plan on scrubbing walls, flat latex does not lend itself well for washing. Flat or matte paint finish with no shine is best for walls that have minor surface imperfections. Eggshell or velvet finish has a soft glow and is easier to clean. Satin or semi-gloss paint finishes are best for doors and trim and highlighting architectural details. Some like gloss finish for doors and trim. Both semi-gloss and gloss are easy to clean. If you have small children, you may want washable paint.
 
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Old 05-07-07, 08:14 PM
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There's no recommendation for textured walls

Shinier is easier to clean, but draws more attention to the texture

Flatter is harder to clean but lessens the effect of texture slightly

It depends on what you are looking for
 
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Old 05-07-07, 09:26 PM
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Slickshift verbalized it better than I. Just like with hardwood flooring finishes, higher gloss dramatizes the flaws and scratches because of the way higher gloss finishes refract light. It boils down to what you expect out of the paint. Are your major concerns about cleaning if you have children or a compulsive housekeeper who likes to wash down the walls each spring? Or, are you trying to make the 'texture' of the paneling disappear? IMO, I'd go with eggshell or velvet finish to get the best of both worlds, but that's just me. You get soft glow, no high gloss, and some cleaning ability.
 
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Old 05-08-07, 05:51 AM
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texture highlighting

Thank you for all your replies. I'm not trying to make the texture disappear. (I don't think there is anything I could do to make the texture disappear besides put drywall over it.) In fact I was even thinking about highlighting it by painting one color then if I get around to it, wiping on a second color which would only pickup the outer part of the paneling and thus make it look striped. I plan to use light colors. The essential purpose is to make the basement walls lighter. My concern with using less glossy paint is that dust would stay in the indentations and make it harder to clean. It is not like I have ever cleaned the walls in the basement, but they are a pretty dark brown, so I can't see any dust or dirt. Presumable when I paint them lighter (off-white) if they do pickup dust, I will be able to see it.

I was thinking of using a painting pad to put on a second color if that works out.
 
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Old 05-08-07, 08:26 AM
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I would add

If the paneling has never been painted it would be a good idea to first start with a solvent based primer.
 
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Old 05-08-07, 01:33 PM
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Kilz/ and brush vs roller

I was planning on washing the walls and then putting on Kilz latex primer. I'm really sold on Kilz. I live in an area where it is hard to come by oil based paint due to pollution standards. I like Kilz because it sticks to anything. The paneling itself is not glossy, it is raw wood.

Now that I think of it I might have to brush the paint on so I get a nice texture instead of roll on the paint.. or roll on the paint and then brush up paint on the wall so I don't get the texture of a roller. The texture of a paint brush would be more appropriate.
 
 

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