Painting Exterior Asbestos Shingles (Cement Fiber Boards)


  #1  
Old 05-16-07, 01:29 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Painting Exterior Asbestos Shingles (Cement Fiber Boards)

Need an advice of painting Asbestos Shingles.

We bought a 150 year old Victorian house. This thing is massive (8000 sf) a lot of very detailed molding so I am looking for ways to save time while still doing the best job I can. I've been painting the molding and woodwork with SW Duration. That has been going well but now I need to work on some the body and have decided on SW SuperPaint. I painted a large section with a 4" brush but it takes way too long and kills my hands. I just bought a Graco Ultra 395 airless sprayer and hopefully it will work better.

The problem is:

When pressure washing the asbestos shingles some of the paint comes off and some does not. If I go over the area again more paint will come off. How much do I need to get off? I am using a Husky 1750 psi PW, didn't want to have any higher pressure sent to those shingles.

Any suggestions? I was kicking around the idea of diluting some Easy Strip and spray it all over the wall, then pressure wash. Thoughts? Do I really need to do all that?

I don't have any pictures of the problem but here are some of the house. The first couple are some of the progress I made last year.

http://home.comcast.net/~bruppert/wsb/html/view.cgi-home.html-.html
 
  #2  
Old 05-16-07, 02:02 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,395
Received 720 Likes on 631 Posts
Welcome to the forums Bryan -- nice house!!

You are right to go easy with the pressure. Obviously the more loose paint you remove the better. Not always feasable to remove it all, fresh paint will help what you don't remove to stay adhered longer. You also need to make sure the surface isn't chalky as paint doesn't adhere well to chalk. If you can't remove all the chalk you can either spray on a masonary conditioner or add emulsa bond to the paint. The folks at your local SWP store can help you determine which will be best for your paint job.

Spraying will speed the job along, just be carefull, mindfull of where the spray and overspray are going. I like to spray and backroll these type of shingles, it helps to get better coverage. With spray alone there will always be areas that don't get sufficent paint coverage.
 
  #3  
Old 05-17-07, 11:17 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks

Yeah people love looking at the house and are more than willing to pick up a beer or pool cue.... though not many takers on grabbing a scraper or brush.

How do I tell if it is "chalky"? When I finished powerwashing the color was much lighter and looked to have a white coating on it. I ran my hand over it after it dried but nothing white came off onto my hand.

A friend had suggested adding Emulsa Bond but Sherwin Williams suggested priming with Loxon. I called their commercial division and the guy I spoke with said to just powerwash then coat twice with Superpaint.

At lastly, how do you backroll? What's the trick? I tried using a roller last year but the bottom of the shingles made too many drips and didn't seem to cover completely. Painting with a brush did a nice job but I'm getting a little old for all that work.

I really appreciate the advice!! I like hearing hearing a bunch of opinions so I can make a good decision.
 
  #4  
Old 05-17-07, 07:19 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,395
Received 720 Likes on 631 Posts
" How do I tell if it is "chalky? "

If you have a white residue on your finger after wiping it across the substrate you have chalk - sounds like you're ok.

" And lastly, how do you backroll? "

Basicly you just lightly roll over the area sprayed. Your siding needs a 1"-1.5" nap size. The roller helps to push the paint into all the areas where the spray just laid a film on top [or missed some ]



I don't think I've used any of the Loxon primer but understand it is a good primer for masonary surfaces. I tend to agree with the comm div who said to just use 2 coats of super paint. I'd probably add emulsa bond to the first coat just for insurance because it does promote good adhesion.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: