Waterborne BM Satin Impervo over water-based poly?


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Old 05-17-07, 01:01 PM
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Waterborne BM Satin Impervo over water-based poly?

I have 100+ MDF 1footx1foot shelves, which were (mistakenly) painted with semi-gloss acrylic latex paint and subsequently, in order to minimize blocking, coated with one thin coat of water-based polyurethane. (I know... I know... a hard coat over a soft coat is still a soft coat...)

Although they are in good condition, for many reasons (long story) I am considering re-painting them with two coats Benjamin Moore Satin Impervo. I understand that it's 100% acrylic (no latex resin) and therefore block-resistant. Is this a good idea? I think (and hope) I don't need a primer. If so, is a light sanding needed to abrade the poly? Or something like BM self-priming IronClad waterborned low luster (for wood and metal) be better and also block-resistant since it is (I think) also 100% acrylic?

(I know that alkyd would be better, but I need quick drying...)

Thanks
 
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Old 05-17-07, 06:00 PM
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I'm not real familiar with BM paints but it should be fine. I don't think additional primer would be needed over water based poly but don't know for sure, don't think I've ever had to paint over water based poly. I would definetly sand the surface to be painted.

Have you considered using a waterborne enamel? It dries fast and hard.

Is the iron clad similiar to SWP's proclassic waterborne?
 
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Old 05-18-07, 08:49 AM
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Marksr, thanks for your reply.

Yes, I think BM waterborne satin impervo is similar to SW proclassic. One final question: is a product like BM waterborne satin impervo (100% acrylic, no latex resin as far as I know) block-resistant enough to be suitable for bookshelves? I don't have a spray so I will be brushing. Thanks.
 
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Old 05-18-07, 02:51 PM
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I answered this at lunch time, wonder where it went? oh well, let me try again

I'm not sure I understand what you mean by blocking but the waterborne enamel dries almost as hard as oil base enamel. It will work fine on a bookshelf. Waterborne enamel can be brushed, rolled or sprayed. It brushes a little different than oil or latex but it isn't hard to get the hang of it.
 
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Old 05-18-07, 03:06 PM
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Thank you very much for your reply.

By "blocking" I meant that books or objects placed on top of the painted shelf will "stick" to it. I know that paints with latex resin remain "soft" for a long long time and can have blocking, and that this is the reason why it is recommended to paint shelves with alkyd paint (which I can't due to need of quick dry). I also understand that 100% acrylics have, well, 0% latex resine and thus don't exhibit blocking and are suitable for shelving, etc.

I will plan to use either a very short nap roller or a foam roller, although I don't have a lot of experience with foam rollers. I will also use a high quality synthetic brush

Thanks again.
 
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Old 05-18-07, 03:16 PM
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There won't be any sticking issues with waterborne enamel - unless you set books/stuff on it an hour or two after apllication 24 hrs would be good drying time.
 
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Old 05-18-07, 05:42 PM
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The BM Satin Impervo is an excellent choice
The poly as an undercoating, however, is disturbing and will do nothing for the "sticking"

The poly should be at least lightly sanded (if not sanded off) and an a coat of Ben Moore's Regal First Coat (for sealing and enamel holdout) applied

Ben Moore's (latex) Fresh Start or another brand's quality enamel underbody would be my next choices
 
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Old 05-18-07, 08:56 PM
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slickshift,

Thanks for your reply. Sorry that I wasn't clear. I first painted the shelves about a year ago, but used acrylic latex paint. Once I realized that the latex resin leads to blocking, and following advice from numerous people, I lightly sanded and applied a *thin* coat of minwax water-based poly: since it has acrylic (and poly) resin, but not latex resin, the poly would help to minimize blocking. The poly was an over-coat, not an under-coat.

Now, I am considering re-painting the shelves with 100% acrylic -- after the proper prep work, which will include at a minimum a good sanding to properly abrade the poly from last year.

Or I can just forget about Impervo and live with my shelves continuing to have the year old latex-plus-poly combo, which has so far worked well to minimize blocking...

Thanks.

Carlos
 
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Old 05-18-07, 09:12 PM
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Ah...I see...

I still wouldn't use a waterborne enamel (or any other paint for that matter) over poly w/o a primer (or undercoating)

I can tell you the Impervo doesn't do the sticking thing
I have it all over my house with no sticking
 
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Old 05-19-07, 08:33 AM
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slickshift,

Thanks for the reply. Given that I have more than one hundred 1footx1foot shelves, light sanding + enamel would be a lot of work but feasible. But primer + enamel may be too much work for the limited time I have.

At this point, it's probably better that I drop plans for re-painting and just leave the shelves with paint+poly - I prefer to have that rather than an improperly prepared surface. (I know that future touch-ups will be a pain, though, since I will have to sand thru the poly)

Thanks
 
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Old 05-19-07, 02:43 PM
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The poly doesn't have to be sanded off to insure a good bond, just roughed up with 150-180 grit sandpaper.
 
 

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