Mold in the paint

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-25-07, 01:02 AM
Sly Bald Guy's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Cool Mold in the paint

Hey everyone, glad to have found this forum.

My wife and I just took over her father's house and in one of the bathrooms there is very poor air circulation and ventilation which I believe is the reason that mold grew above and around the shower.

The mold has been there for a while and now has caused the paint to crack and flake. In a couple areas where the paint has flaked off I have come to find out that the mold is contained to the top layer of the 4 layers of paint that are on the walls.

I'm hoping to remove the mold and apply a new layer of paint as a temporary solution until we get the financing to completely remodel the bathroom and the rest of the house. Any suggestions on the best way to do this?
 
  #2  
Old 05-25-07, 04:39 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,837
Received 361 Votes on 318 Posts
Welcome to the forums

How did you determine that the mold is limitted to the top 4 layers of paint?

If it is possible to clean off the mold with a bleach water solution you may be able to coat the area with a solvent based primer and repaint. If the mold can't be removed by cleaning you would need to remove and replace the drywall.
 
  #3  
Old 05-25-07, 06:21 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,609
Received 97 Votes on 85 Posts
In the meantime, you need to find a way to improve ventilation in the bathroom or any repainting job will be soon full of mold as well. Worst case scenario, put a box fan in the doorway and run it for a half hour after a shower or bath.
 
  #4  
Old 05-25-07, 03:48 PM
Sly Bald Guy's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Welcome to the forums

How did you determine that the mold is limitted to the top 4 layers of paint?
I was cleaning the walls with a solution of water and Tide w/ Bleach as that's what a friend recommended we do. While doing that, some of the TOP LAYER of the paint that contains the mold ended up chipping off - about a 2" by 2" square. Below was left a mold free layer of paint. I then used a tool to remove the top layer of paint from a few other areas and it also left a mold free layer of paint below.
 
  #5  
Old 05-25-07, 03:58 PM
Sly Bald Guy's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mitch17 View Post
In the meantime, you need to find a way to improve ventilation in the bathroom or any repainting job will be soon full of mold as well. Worst case scenario, put a box fan in the doorway and run it for a half hour after a shower or bath.
Thanks! My plan is to put a dehumidifier in there for the next 3 or 4 months until I can then replace all of the drywall and add in a fan and swap out the bathroom window.
 
  #6  
Old 05-25-07, 04:37 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,818
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Dehumidifier will reduce humidity. Fans will improve air circulation. If installing a bathroom vent/fan unit, get one that is properly sized for the size of the bathroom and enough air exchanges per minute (CFMs--cubic feet per minute). Make sure it is vented through the roof or wall.

Many install undersized units, fail to run them, etc. Mold & mildew spores are everywhere in the air. When they find a damp, poorly ventilated, soiled surface, they settle in. Mildew prone areas need to be disinfected and thoroughly cleaned. Application of a spray disinfectant like Lysol can also keep mildew abay. Once you install the vent/fan unit, make sure it runs for at least 20 minutes after showering/bathing to eliminate humidity from the bathroom.

In the meantime, shower with the bathroom door open. I live in a rental with an undersized vent/fan unit. When I turn it on it sounds like a Briggs & Stratton lawn mower engine. Of course, I shower with door open and keep all surfaces disinfected. No problemo with mold and mildew without running fan. Of course, the bathroom is extremely clean, but I refuse to dwell on the the noisy fan, poor construction, damaged vinyl floor, poor caulking, dripping faucets, hideous and moisture damaged mirror, dated light bar, damage to fiberglass shower tub unit by previous renters, etc.

The point is to keep all surfaces clean and disinfected, improve air circulation, and reduce humidity. If privacy is not a major issue, keep the bathroom door open.
 
  #7  
Old 05-25-07, 11:40 PM
Sly Bald Guy's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the advice twelvepole!
 
  #8  
Old 05-26-07, 05:09 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,837
Received 361 Votes on 318 Posts
Remove all the mold/mildew that you can, sand and skim coat the low areas with joint compound, prime and top coat with a K&B paint or atleast add extra mildewcide to your enamel. You may want to wear a mask while you clean and sand - especially if you have allergies or other health problems.
 
  #9  
Old 05-26-07, 09:28 AM
D
Member
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: United states
Posts: 276
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Talking

Also, be careful when putting your dehumidifier in the bathroom - please make sure that it is well grounded - remember moisture and electrical appliances don't play happy together....
I think the fan in the hallway would be the best option, along with showering with the door open...

Blessings,
 
  #10  
Old 06-02-07, 04:45 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 58
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hello,

Kind of OT but:

"Of course, the bathroom is extremely clean, but I refuse to dwell on the the noisy fan, poor construction, damaged vinyl floor, poor caulking, dripping faucets, hideous and moisture damaged mirror, dated light bar, damage to fiberglass shower tub unit by previous renters, etc."

You seriously need to find a decent landlord. Some of us (landlords) actually do take no small measure of pride in the condition of our rentals. We recently spent ~ $800.00 in improvements to what was otherwise an "ok" to "pretty decent" bathroom on our most recent buy.
- new vinyl floor.
- new Moen fixtures.
- new FG tub surround.
- tore the old tile & drywall down to the studs and replaced it with cement board.
- new medicine cabinet - sink - vanity. The old light fixture passed muster though.
(sorry to climb on the soapbox - "rotten landlords" are a pet peeve since they give all of us LL a bad rep)


"Also, be careful when putting your dehumidifier in the bathroom - please make sure that it is well grounded - remember moisture and electrical appliances don't play happy together.... "

GFI - ground fault interruptor - will "fix" that.
As far as I know, it's code to have one within 10 feet of any water source.
In our rentals, we take it a step further and GFI protect just about everything.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: