Stripper for Acrylic Paint?

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-28-07, 10:01 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: south Alabama
Posts: 73
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Stripper for Acrylic Paint?

I have recently been attempting to strip, sand, & paint a set of louvered, double bi-fold doors and as I am now about 1/2-way into the stripping process, then I have begun to wonder if I have used the correct chemical to remove the paint.

It looks to me as if the doors were originally painted with acrylic paint and they may have even had the paint baked on as well. Whatever the case, the stuff has been the dickens to remove and that's what prompted me to wonder if I was using the right chemical to attack it with.

I have even tried using a heat gun in various places on the doors to see if that would make the process go faster and I have discovered that I have to hold the heat gun and scaper simultaneously to get the stuff off (still not that easily though). I have made a couple of boo-boos though with the gun (by not being as attentive as I need to be while scraping) and have singed the louvers in various, small places.

I have been using Klean-Strip (the strongest variety), but it only seems to soften up a thin surface area and there is still a lot of paint left underneath to remove.

Is there something else besides Klean-Strip that is best for stripping acrylic paint specifically??

Also, (if I ever get the acrylic paint removed) I plan to prime and paint the doors (again) with acrylic paint and having painted with acrylic paint before, then I know that it starts hardening almost immediately, so I was wondering if there was something available to thin out the acrylic stuff just a little so that it's easier to work with. I have seen Floetrol mentioned here previously for thinning acrylic paint, but I'm not sure that I ever seen it here in the Southeast. Does it go by any other names?

Finally, (since I am going to repaint with acrylic) does that mean that the primer should be acrylic-based as well?

Thanks.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-28-07, 12:43 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,550
Received 301 Votes on 267 Posts
Why are you stripping the doors??? If you plan to repaint them why not just sand them and repaint?

I seldom use any strippers but doubt there is a whole lot of difference between brands. Some types are better suited for particular stripping jobs. I usually ask at the paint store what type would be best for the particular job.

You can use floetrol, XIM or a little water to thin latex paint.
 
  #3  
Old 05-28-07, 02:40 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: south Alabama
Posts: 73
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Re:

Thanks for replying, marksr!

My own (convoluted?) reasoning told me to strip the doors down so that I could then spread some wood filler into several places that have some dings, dents, and mar marks (some much more noticeable than others).

Also, it just seemed that it would be easier, not to mention quicker if I used the chemical to loosen the paint first and then scrape it away.

In my previous experience, oil-based paints have always behaved rather well when using the chemical stripper. All of it just bubbled up and then you could just scrape it away, but the old acrylic on these doors seems to have other ideas.

Can I still use the wood filler to touch up some of the deep dings even if all of the old paint in those areas is not removed?
 
  #4  
Old 05-28-07, 03:06 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,550
Received 301 Votes on 267 Posts
Read the wood filler label. I often use spackling or j/c to fix nicks and gouges with no problem. Sometimes I'll use painter's putty but it can be trickier to apply neatly.
 
  #5  
Old 05-28-07, 04:20 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I've used Kleen Strip
Not being there, I can't say for sure, but it could be just the normal mess associated with todays strippers
Honestly, I wouldn't do a project like that myself (stripping bi-fold louvered doors), I'd bring them to a strip shop
...and I'm a professional painter

Even at this point, I'd suggest bringing them to a specialist
You should be able to call around for a price to decide if it's worth it at this point

You can then prime and paint with latex products if you wish
 
  #6  
Old 05-28-07, 07:37 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: south Alabama
Posts: 73
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Re:

Thanks for the reply, slickshift!

Yes, I have already been aware for some time about the hazards of tackling the louvered, bi-fold doors by myself.

Unfortunately, I have already checked into the possibility of taking them to a strip-shop and the $$$ they wanted was almost considered highway robbery!

Since I've been posting to this thread throughout the day, then I have self-learned a few things that will make my tedious, aggravating work move a little faster.

Hopefully, I have dealt with my last set of louvered doors for quite sometime.

Many thanks to both you and marksr for your helpful replies!
 
  #7  
Old 05-29-07, 06:33 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ah...I see...
Well, carry on then

Let us know how it works out, and please don't hesitate to post up any tips you think others attempting the same type project would find helpful
Thanks!
Good Luck!
 
  #8  
Old 05-30-07, 04:50 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 58
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hello Dixie,
Sometimes - some things just aren't worth the effort.

Have you considered simply replacing them?
 
  #9  
Old 05-30-07, 11:19 AM
car_man_76's Avatar
Member
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Bangor
Posts: 20
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Dixie, The best paint stripper ive seen is a product made by Sterling called 5F5. The best thing for you to do is to let the chemical work you cant be too impatiant. most strippers need 20- 40 minutes set time to work. once you brush them onto the surface dont touch them until they've had time to work. Only do a small area at a time. Once you do get all the paint off and before you paint, you must clean the surface with an after wash to remove any residue left from stripper. then use a good quality 100% acrylic primer before you paint.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: