Tips on controlling overspray when painting exterior?


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Old 06-18-07, 03:52 PM
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Tips on controlling overspray when painting exterior?

We are using an airless to spray latex on eaves of brick house. Noticed quite a bit of overspray drifting onto the bricks when I sprayed one section of the house. They are not turning white by any means, but are getting a little dusting. Is there any shortcut to dealing with this? We are going to tape up plastic over all the brick...but would love to find some shortcut that would not require all this prep. I thought about spraying the bricks with water first, or soapy water, or something so the paint would not stick, but no idea if this would work. Any tips or other clever solutions? Or do you just have to bite the bullet and tape up plastic everywhere?

Thanks,
Chris
 
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Old 06-18-07, 05:53 PM
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The water idea won't work and you'll have a hard time taping to brick. The slightest wind will turn the plastic into a large kite. You can probably make a low-tech paint shield for yourself with a 1x2 and a big piece of cardboard. Hold the paint shield over the bricks (or have someone else hold it) while you spray and move it as you move. Cutting with a brush along the bricks first would be your best bet if you'd like to do a good job.

I hope you are backrolling or back brushing- an airless may not give you very good adhesion, especially if the surface is dusty / has not been cleaned and prepped.
 
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Old 06-18-07, 07:05 PM
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The trick/tip/shortcut is to use a paint shield

It's a large rectangular piece of plastic or metal on a stick
It's about 3 feet long and 1 foot wide
You hold it up over the bricks while spraying, right up the the molding

The metal ones are "better", inasmuchas they don't bend so much
But they are heavier
The plastic ones are lighter
 
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Old 06-19-07, 04:51 AM
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I agree using a shield is the best way to go. There are times when it's best to use an improvised shield but the metal store bought shields are the best. As slick mentioned they come in both plastic and metal. the plastic is thicker so it's harder to get a good crisp line. You need to clean the shield every so often to prevent paint transfer. Some shields have a threaded handle which works well if you have a helper - they can use a roller pole to set the shield where you need it. They come in various widths [2'-4']

Several hours of using a shield can really be tiresome. Holding the shield in one hand and the gun in the other isn't bad a first but it will really make you weary before your done
 
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Old 06-19-07, 08:13 AM
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I do have a shield for when I'm spraying directly adjacent to the brick, but the bigger problem seems to be spraying up into the eaves. The drift of the paint down onto the bricks is the issue, I think. I would need a giant shield to cover that.

Maybe spraying is not the best way to go. I thought it would be a lot faster, but it sounds like even with spraying you need to "back roll" or go over it with a brush also, so what's the advantage?
 
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Old 06-19-07, 08:31 AM
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A pro painter can save time and apply a heavier coat with spray but it is really a job by job decision as to whether or not is cost effective. Because of the better equipment [used by a pro] and his extensive expereince what works good for a pro isn't always best for a diyer.

I seldom spray near brick. You always have to be mindfull as to where the overspray will travel.
 
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Old 06-19-07, 12:52 PM
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I rarely spray trim also

...Maybe dentil molding
But I "cut in" above and below with a brush
And do them by hand (< shivers >...hates dentil molding) if any of a dozen or so potential problem situations are identifiable
 
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Old 06-19-07, 01:02 PM
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...oh yeah, mini rollers (sometimes called hot dog rollers) are great for eaves and soffits
 
 

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