looking for confirmation on peeling paint

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Old 07-18-07, 12:28 PM
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Question looking for confirmation on peeling paint

Hi...I know that this question has been asked a dozen times and more and I'm sure I know the answer but I just need to make sure before I put alot of work into something and then have to redo it so I apologise in advance for asking the same question.

I am wanting to redo my childs bedroom. The previous owners of my house had painted the room with beautone latex velvet paint. I noticed On the one exterior wall that this paint started to peel in the corner close to the floor and around the light socket. In the corner (where it peeled), it looks like once upon a time that there was some patch work done for some kind of damage. The interior wall opposite is fine and the other exterior wall with the window in it was I believe a wallboard that was painted over and that is fine.

I am wondering if the paint is peeling because the walls are of a plaster (the house was built in 1962) and they previous owners didn't use a proper (if any) primer before applying the latex paint or if I have some kind of moisture behind the wall. I know my walls are plaster because they have some kind of stippling on them that was mixed in a gloss of something. This stippling will not come off, believe me, I tried when I was redoing my kitchen, lol. The reason I bring the moisture issue into question is because in the winter time (when it's -30c) the wall is very cold to touch.

Is it because of improper paint prep or is the problem due to moisture?
 
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Old 07-18-07, 12:36 PM
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Sight unseen I'd guess that moisture is the culprit. Lack off or insufficent insulation and vapor barrier will cause there to be a moisture problem, there doesn't have to be a leak.
 
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Old 07-18-07, 12:55 PM
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ARRRGGGGG I was hoping that I could get away without resheeting the wall as I am horrible at plastering!!! I get bumps and everything. Well hopefully there is a good section on plastering, lol.
 
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Old 07-18-07, 01:06 PM
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I wouldn't tear the wall done just yet. There might be better ways to correct the insulation/vapor barrier issues. If you do wind up tearing out the wall, I'd go back with drywall and then finish and texture it to simulate the plaster texture.
 
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Old 07-18-07, 01:11 PM
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what would you suggest for correcting the vapor barrier issues with out tearing down the wall?
 
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Old 07-19-07, 08:56 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
I wouldn't tear the wall done just yet. There might be better ways to correct the insulation/vapor barrier issues. If you do wind up tearing out the wall, I'd go back with drywall and then finish and texture it to simulate the plaster texture.

Could someone tell me what other ways there are to correct a vapour barrier problem without tearing down the walls?
 
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Old 07-19-07, 10:55 AM
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I'm pretty sure I read somewhere there was a coating that could be applied to the wall to mimic a vapor barrier but I've not been able to find any info on it I know SWP has a coating for reflecting heat in attics but I don't know if that would work or not.

Vapor barrier is just part of the problem since you said the wall is very cold to the touch during the winter. Removing the plaster and updating the insulation is probably the most effective way to fix the problem but you might be able to have insulation blown into the wall cavities from the outside. Basically the cut a hole and blow in the insulation, I assume they have ready made material to patch the hole with. This would be a lot less work and mess than tearing out the walls on the inside.

IMO it is best to research all the options before deciding which avenue to take.
 
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Old 07-28-07, 06:33 PM
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But if I just went with blowing more insulation in, wouldn't I still be stuck with a cold wall? I'm just wondering that if there is no vapour barrier behind the drywall or the insulation is wet, wouldn't adding new insullation just eventually make that wet as well?
 
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