Prime existing old paint?

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Old 08-07-07, 02:57 PM
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Prime existing old paint?

Hi, this is ref. exterior of house in New England, and ref. painting the trim only, not the body of the house. Old paint is latex. Where paint is well adhered, I will be cleaning it and perhaps rough sanding. I realize that the "sales approach" of paint companys is to prime existing such paint supposedly because their primer is made to adhere to all prior paints, or bare wood where sanded bare. I want to do this job to effect the longest lasting paint quality but wonder if there is a semi gloss or similar (again this is for trim only) that is a finish paint having excellent adhesion to old paint? Your thoughts are appreciated. Thanks, Steve
 
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Old 08-07-07, 03:57 PM
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I would spot prime any bare wood and bypass on the total prime. Total prime only when adhesion issues were present and it was deemed appropriate.
 
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Old 08-07-07, 06:06 PM
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"Where paint is well adhered, I will be cleaning it and perhaps rough sanding. I realize that the "sales approach" of paint companys is to prime existing such paint supposedly because their primer is made to adhere to all prior paints"

There should be no reason (short of a drastic color change or other issues) to prime good adhering paint in good condition
A good cleaning and light scuff sanding (and wiping off the dust from sanding) should be sufficient

The best adhering satin sheened exterior trim paint I've used is Duration by Sherwin Williams
It's thick, but covers well and has excellent adhesion
Technically, it's self-priming
However, I don't skip the prime step if it's needed (like for bare wood or spot priming over scraped bare areas), and the Duration works excellent in tough situations like old worn wood, salt air, high sun and (former) peel problem areas
It's not cheap, but it certainly has most excellent adhesion to old paint
 
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